Public finale

Experience the public finale of the 2nd International Schimmel Piano Competition 2022 live in Braunschweig! 

All participants of the preliminary rounds and the final round including a short vita as well as the specially designed concert programmes can be found here:

 

Preliminary Round Day One

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Friday, 23 September 2022

 
  09:30 - 10:00 Aliya Iskhakova
10:00 - 10:30 Maya Purdue 11:00 - 11:30 Jingyeong Jung
11:30 - 12:00 Onute Grazinyte 12:00 - 12:30 Lukas Katter
14:00 - 14:30 Frédéric Otterbach 14:30 - 15:00 Zikai Zhang
  16:00 - 16:30 Maria Khokhlova
16:30 - 17:00 Mikheil Kandashvili  17:00 - 17:30 Chiara Biagioli

 

Preliminary Round Day Two

Saturday, 24 September 2022

 
09:00 - 09:30 Ryohong Ahn 09:30 - 10:00 Lorenzo Mazzola
10:00 - 10:30 Florian Altwegg 11:00 - 11:30 Georg Kjurdian
11:30 - 12:00 Tsuzumi Namikawa 12:00 - 12:30 Andrey Denisenko
14:00 - 14:30 Greta Maria Lobefaro 14:30 - 15:00 Jinseok Maeng
15:00 - 15:30 Viacheslav Shelepov 16:00 - 16:30 Johannes Obermeier
16:30 - 17:00 Ayaka Watanabe 17:00 - 17:30 Xinlai Liu

 

Final Round

Sunday, 25 September 2022

 
09:00 - 10:00 Onute Grazinyte 10:00 - 11:00 Maria Khokhlova
11:00 - 12:00 Tsuzumi Namikawa 13:00 - 14:00 Georg Kjurdian
14:00 - 15:00 Johannes Obermeier 15:00 - 16:00 Lorenzo Mazzola

 

Award Winners Concert

Sunday, 25 September 2022

 
19:00 - 20:15 Concert Part 1 20:35 - 22:00 Concert Part 2
   

PRELIMINARY ROUND DAY ONE

 

 

 

 

Professor Wolfgang Zill

Aliya Iskhakova

Russia

Friday, 23 September 2022

09:30 - 10:00

 

Biography

 

Aliya Iskhakova began her study in the Russian city of Kazan. Her first teachers were Era Sayfullina and Evgeni Mikhailov. After graduation with honours from Kazan musical college and Kazan conservatory, Aliya continued her education in the Netherlands. She obtained master's degrees from Codarts with Bart van de Roer and Amsterdam conservatory with Naum Grubert. She also participates in various masterclasses, including those given by Boris Berman, Menahem Pressler, Ivry Gitlis, Pavel Gililov, Konstantin Lifschitz, and Stephen Kovacevich.

Aliya is a prize-winner of 11 national and international music competitions. She gives concerts in the Netherlands, France, Belgium, Germany, and Spain and performs in such famous halls as Concertgebouw, Bimhuis, Theatre Adyar and others. In 2017, she has recorded Mozart piano concerto K488 for BravaTV with Symphonic collective of the Netherlands, conducted by Henk de Graaf.

Besides solo recitals, Aliya plays a lot as a chamber musician. She performed in Musica Mundi and Storioni international chamber music festivals together with violinist Ilya Gringolts, clarinettist Christoffer Sundqvist and percussionist Dominique Vleeshouwers. 

Having a broad classical repertoire, Aliya seeks to introduce to the public music of Tatar composers from her home region Tatarstan Republic. Together with violinist Yulia Gubaydullina, they created Duo Mong. The music of Nazib Zhiganov, Roustem Yakhin and others is often in their recital programs and arouses a big interest in the audience. 

 

Concert programme

 

Tatar classical music

  • Nazib Zhiganov (1911-1988): 12 sketches
  • Rustem Yakhin (1921-1993): Nightingale
  • Farid Yarullin (1914-1943): Ballade of Suyumbike and Dance of Fire Witch from the ballet «Shurale»

"Tatar is an ancient nation with a rich historical and cultural heritage. Nowadays, there are around 7 million Tatars in the world, and most of them live in Russia in the Republic of Tatarstan. There are big Tatar diasporas in many European countries. However, Tatar culture and music remain almost unknown. At the same time, Tatar classical music is a good example of the connection between eastern and western musical traditions. 

 

Historically Tatar music has been developed in the eastern tradition, which means that the music was never written down, it was passed orally from the teacher to the student, and it was based on pentatonic modes. In the 20th century, with the opening of musical institutions, Tatar composers got a chance to study the composition of the western school. From that moment, they tried to combine the ornamental and improvised Tatar melodies with western harmonies and forms.    

 

Farid Yarullin, Rustem Yakhin and Nazib Zhiganov were the first of them. They opened a new chapter in the development of Tatar classical music. Farid Yarullin became an author of the first Tatar ballet based on the folk fairytales about Shurale (spirit of the forest) and Suyumbike (princess-swan). Rustem Yakhin, the brilliant pianist who was often called «Tatar Chopin» because of his romantic style, composed over 500 songs and their transcriptions for piano. And Nazib Zhiganov was the first Tatar composer who wrote operas and symphonies."


 

 

 

 

Professor Wolfgang Zill

Maya Purdue

Ireland

Friday, 23 September 2022

10:00 - 10:30

 

Biography

 

Tokyo-born pianist Maya Purdue has dazzled audiences across Europe and Asia, rapidly establishing herself as an exciting young talent among the next generation of pianists. After performing solo recitals in many famous venues across Japan, including Suny Hall, Tiara Koto Hall, Tokyo Bunka Kaikan, lshibashi Memorial Hall and Suginami Koukaido Hall, Maya has based herself in Austria, where she studies at the prestigious Mozarteum University Salzburg under Professor Cordelia Höfer-Teutsch. 

In Austria, Maya has played in the "Wiener Musikverein", famous as one of the most important concert halls in Europe, home of the legendary Wiener Philharmoniker. Also, she performed at the Mozarthaus Vienna, and Wiener Saal, among other venues. In 2022 Maya won the competition within Mozarteum University and will compete in the Bechstein Bruckner Competition in Linz which allows only one representative of each music university in Austria. 

From a very young age, Maya competed in many national and international piano competitions. Her accolades include 1st Prize in "Tiaa's Rising Star Concert" with her performance in the Gala concert and 2nd Prize in the Higashi-Kantou Piano Competition (Superior Category) 

Maya started her musical studies very young, commencing with Dalcroze Eurhythmics and at 3 began playing the piano under the guidance of her mother, a piano teacher. She continued her studies with Masahito Shimizu. In 2016, she began her Bachelor of Music Performance at the Ueno Gakuen University of Music in Tokyo, studying under many world-class teachers, including Yukio Yokoyama and Katsumi Ueda, 

In October of 2018, she was granted entry to the University of Performing Arts Graz, where she studied under Professor Peter Josza. 

Maya regularly gives Concerts in Salzburg, Graz, Munich, and other cities in Europe. In 2020, she was selected as an accompanist for an opera project held in Wiener Musikverein, followed by many other very successful concerts in Vienna. From March 2021, as a member of Live Music Now Salzburg, she is 

recognized even more in Salzburg as a young artist. In 2021 Maya toured in Japan, including the prefectures Shiga, Nagoya, and Osaka, supported by Yumephoto, an Osaka-based company, as charity events for those who do not have access to classical concerts. A lady of many talents, Maya is also the host of a radio show, each week broadcasting new episodes of her 'Musical Journey.

 

Concert programme

 

Vienna- intertwined composers 

  • Robert Schumann (1810-1856): Faschingsschwank aus Wien
  • Franz Liszt (1811-1886): Soirées de Vienne, S.427, 1846–52
    • No.6 Allegro con strepito

"Vienna has been the capital of classical music for many centuries. Even in this modern age, those in and outside of Europe visit Vienna to listen to its famous Viennese style, tunes, and rhythms, and it is safe to say there is significant admiration for how traditions have been preserved with great quality in Vienna. What fascinates me is that this is not only the case for us musicians now, but also for the well-known composers. Vienna has been an inspiration for so many musicians over the centuries. Therefore, I would like to focus on the admiration composers had for each other which drew them to Vienna, and the expectations they had for this city, and in return the inspiration and disappointment it gave them. To dive into the more personal side of these composers gives us the possibility to sympathize with our idols, those whom we see as exemplars of our ideals, and better understand the similarities we have with them, and even similar situations we face now.

Schumann began to compose Faschingsschwank aus Wien Op. 26 in Vienna in 1839. He wrote the first four movements in Vienna, and the last on his return to Leipzig. This piece is specifically full of humor, and sarcasm. For instance, in the 1st movement of this piece, he briefly quotes the French national anthem, La Marseillaise, as a sarcastic comment on the situation then in Austria. He came to Vienna with his wife Clara in 1838, and surprisingly only stayed for one year. He had great expectations for this city, since Beethoven, Mozart and Schubert established their success there and were his idols. Unfortunately, he could not find the success he was looking for in Vienna and returned to Leipzig.

However, it is undeniable that in this period he created many of his most significant compositions, such as Fantasie in C major, Op.17, Kreisleriana, Op. 16 (1838), and Kinderszenen, Op. 15. Franz Liszt played Schumann‘s Kreisleriana with Schumann in the audience. In this period Schumann visited Schubert‘s brother and discovered his previously unknown Symphony No.9 and many more sketches which inspired him deeply. Schumann dedicated Fantasie in C major, Op.17 composed in 1836, to Liszt in 1839, it also being a monument to Beethoven, whom Schumann and Liszt respected greatly. In return, Liszt dedicated his one and only sonata to Schumann.

Liszt on the other hand had a slightly different connection with the city of Vienna. In 1823, he was 11 and had very successful concerts in Vienna as a prodigy, supported by his father. But this stay ended up being quite short, due to the political situation of Hungary and Austria. Later in his life, he held many recitals in Vienna, but never lived and settled there.

The piece I picked from Liszt is a transcription of 12 Waltzes by Franz Schubert, first published in 1827, when Liszt was 16. Soirées de Vienne was published between 1846 and 1852. Schubert and Liszt had met alongside Beethoven when Liszt made his debut in Vienna. Often Liszt is considered a more innovative, less conservative romantic composer than Schumann or Brahms. But when you compare these two pieces side by side in this program, there are different perspectives of respect and revolution happening in both. It is indeed interesting that David Neumeyer has noted the similarity of the first section of Schubert’s Valse Noble, Op. 77, No. 7 (D. 969) to the 1st movement of Schumann‘s Faschingsschwank aus Wien.

I believe that respecting and preserving the quality of tradition, while adding the spice of revolution and the hint of progression should be the aim of us interpreters of classical music too. To better understand how we can achieve these goals, looking back at what was happening 200 years ago is not a step backwards into history, but a guidance for further development in music and art."


 

 

 

 

Professor Wolfgang Zill

Jingyeong Jung

South Korea

Friday, 23 September 2022

11:00 - 11:30

 

Biography

 

The pianist Jingyeong Jung was born in Seoul, South Korea. She studied at the Art School in Incheon and then began piano studies at Hanyang University in Seoul with Prof. Jinuk Kim and Klara Yoonsoo Rhee.

After her successful graduation, she came to Germany and is currently studying with Prof. Wolfgang Manz at the Nuremberg University of Music.

She won the 2nd prize at "The Korea Herald Music Competition", a 2nd prize at "The Korea Music Association International Competition", a Grand Prix at "Russia Omsk International Competition", the "Prix d'Espoir" in Osaka/ Japan, a prize "Crimia Minister for Kulture" in Crimea/Russia.

Jingyeong Jung debuted in the Great Hall of the Seoul Arts Center. After that she played together with the Omsk Philharmonic Orchestra, the Crimean Philharmonic Orchestra, the Seoul National Symphony Orchestra and the Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra.

 

Concert programme

 

Hopeless love

 

  • Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827): 6 Variations in G Major, WoO. 70 "Nel cor piu non mi sento"
  • Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849): Waltz No.9, Op.69 No.1, "L'adieu Valse"
  • Franz Liszt (1811-1886): Rigoletto Paraphrase, S.434
  • Pyotr Ilyich Tschaikowski (1840-1893): Romance in f minor, Op.5

 

"Art is promoted above all by loneliness and pain. Especially the experiences of the composers of "Hopeless Love" give the works incredible depth and intensity.

Unfulfilled love is the theme of the following works by the four composers.

 

In "Concert Paraphrase On Rigoletto", the Duke Mantova tries to seduce Magdalena by all means in the inn. Gilda observes the situation from outside and feels let down by it. Rigoletto is vengeful. These four protagonists sing of their feelings. The complex feelings of each are expressed with a skilful quartet on the piano.

 

The piece "Nel cor piu non mi sento" from the opera G. Paisiello Opera La Molinara has a bright and beautiful melody. The piece is about love that is so hopeless and futile.

 

"Farewell Waltz" is actually a letter in which Chopin expresses his love to his fiancée Maria. Chopin wrote this waltz for her in the hope that she would learn to appreciate his love.

 

Tchaikovsky is engaged to Verdi's soprano Désirée Artôt and dedicated this Romance to her. But after she suddenly married another man, he later said that she had actually been the only love in his life for him."


 

 

 

 

Professor Wolfgang Zill

Onutė Gražinytė

Lithuania

Friday, 23 September 2022

11:30 - 12:00

 

Biography

 

Onutė Gražinytė was born to a family of musicians in 1996 in Vilnius, Lithuania. At the age of five, she started studying piano under her mother. At the age of six, she entered the National M.K. Čiurlionis School of Art.

Since 2015, O. Gražinytė has studied piano under the tutelage of Roland Krüger at the Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media, at the moment she continues her studies in Hanns Eisler Music Academy Berlin in prof. Kirill Gerstein’s class.

She took part in master classes led by Matti Raekallio, Ewa Kupiec, Andrei Gavrilov, Stephen Kovacevich, Ronald Brautigam etc.

O. Gražinytė is a laureate of 10 national and international competitions: was awarded a diploma and a special prize for the best performance of a 20th c. work at the 4th International Young Performers Competition in Głubczyce (Poland, 2007), a prize at the Leonas Povilaitis Young Performers Competition (2008), a prize at the J.S Bach National Competition in Vilnius (2009), a laureate diploma and a special prize for the best performance of B.Dvarionas’ work at the 17th Balys Dvarionas Piano and String Instrument Competition in Vilnius (2012), the first prize at the 4th Rosario Marciano International Piano Competition in Vienna (2012), the first prize and a special prize from a jury member Marian Sobula in the EMCY Peter Toperczer International Piano Competition in Slovakia, etc.

As a soloist, O. Gražinytė has appeared with the Lithuanian State Symphony Orchestra, Alicante University Philharmonic Orchestra, Salzburg Mozarteum Orchestra and National Orchestra of Lyon.

She gave recitals in Lithuania, Switzerland, Italy, Austria, Germany, Estonia, the Netherlands, Poland, France and Denmark.

In 2015, the President of the Republic of Lithuania acknowledged O. Gražinytė for her musical achievements in national and international competitions.

In 2017, O. Gražinytė has collaborated with Musik21 Niedersachsen contemporary music ensemble at the Cologne Philharmonic Hall where she performed a harpsichord part.

In 2018 the young pianist had performed in renowned concert halls, such as Warsaw Philharmonie as well as Berlin Konzerthaus.

In the same year, Onute became a winner of “Haiou Zhang Piano Award 2018”.

She is also an ardent chamber music lover, enjoys playing duos with violin or cello.

In 2020 her debut CD Lamentate (Accentus Music) comprising of the literature for piano by Arvo Pärt in collaboration with Lithuanian National Symphonic Orchestra and Lithuanian National Philharmonie.

 

Concert programme

 

Perspectives

 

  • Arvo Pärt (*1935): "Für Anna Maria. Joyful."
  • Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750): Italian Concerto
  • Arvo Pärt (*1935): "Variations for Healing of Arinushka"
  • Edvard Grieg (1843-1907): From Holberg's Time - Suite in olden style: Präludium - Sarabande - Gavotte
  • Arvo Pärt (*1935): "Für Anna Maria. Thoughtful."

 

"So much in music and art can change depending on perspective. The beauty of a painting is often only seen if you see it in a certain light or at a certain time of day. And it is the same with music: "für Anna Maria" by Arvo Pärt exists in two different lights - "joyful" or "thoughtful". Just by changing your inner perspective on the music, by imagining a different scene, and adjusting a couple of simple parameters, such as timing, dynamic, pedal, and articulation, one can create a profound difference in the way sentiments are communicated. Of course, this sounds very similar to what we call interpretative-freedom, but in this particular case the composer himself invites one to experience the piece in either perspective. There is a similar transfiguration in the "Variations for Healing of Arinushka": the same theme and the same motifs are developed from a minor tonality (sad, mood of un-wellness) into a major tonality of hope, light and joy. Therefore, both pieces show a perspective of time: Anna Maria is a child that seems joyful in one moment, then thoughtful in another; Arinushka goes through a healing process.

So too can we examine the perspective of time through the music of Johann Sebastian Bach and Edvard Grieg.

One is a masterwork of the baroque period, the other is a romantic perspective on the baroque period; both are interpreted with the perspective of contemporary ears.

The program is formed as a palindrome: two works exploring perspectives through the centuries, framed within three miniatures that reflect a change in sentiment from moment to moment."


 

 

 

 

Professor Wolfgang Zill

Lukas Katter

Austria

Friday, 23 September 2022

12:00 - 12:30

 

Biography

 

Lukas Katter was born in Aschaffenburg in 1997. He took part in numerous competitions and achieved, among other things, a first federal prize at Jugend Musiziert as well as 1st prize at the Karlrobert Kreiten Piano Competition 2020. Furthermore, he received scholarships from the Kapesser Foundation as well as the Hans and Stefan Bernbeck Foundation. As a soloist, he has performed with the Wuppertal Symphony Orchestra, the Kollegium Musicum Aschaffenburg, the Jugendzupforchester NRW and the Orchestra of the HfMT Cologne at the Cologne and Wuppertal locations, among others. 

At the beginning of 2019, he was accepted into the sponsorship of YEHUDI MENUHIN Live Music Now e.V.. Since 2015 he studied piano with Prof. Dr. Florence Millet at the Hochschule für Musik und Tanz Köln, where he graduated with a Master's degree in 2022. 

From 2022, he will continue his studies with Prof. Pierre Laurent Aimard. In addition, he has been engaged by the Hochschule as a répétiteur since 2019 and as a support lecturer for piano minor since 2020.

 

Concert programme

 

Water Worlds

  • Carl Tausig (1841-1871): Das Geisterschiff. Ballade (The Ghost Ship)
  • Claude Debussy (1862-1918): La cathédrale engloutie
  • Toru Takemitsu (1930-1996): Rain Tree Sketch II
  • Maurice Ravel (1875-1937): Ondine

 

"Water is the source of all life, dynamic and changeable like hardly anything else: it can trickle, bubble, flow, gush, boil, cool, give life, destroy cities. It is therefore not surprising that this theme has always fascinated composers, especially since the 19th century. In this programme, different musical ways of presenting the power of water musically will be presented.

 

 Carl Tausig's ballad "Das Geisterschiff" (The Ghost Ship) takes up the theme of the Flying Dutchman, who is condemned to wander for all time with his ship across the sea without ever arriving at his destination or finding salvation. The music moves between fiery virtuosity, depictions of sea storms, ghostly passages and triumphant orchestral sounds. 

 

In "La cathédrale engloutie", Debussy incorporates an ancient Breton myth of a cathedral at the bottom of the sea that rises to the surface on a clear day. 

 

"Rain Tree Sketch II" by Toru Takemitsu is about a miraculous rain tree from whose tiny leaves drops of water fall to the ground long after the rain has stopped.

 

In "Ondine" from "Gaspard de la nuit", the poem of the same name by Aloysius Bertrand is made to sound: raindrops pattering against the window pane, quiet and mournful singing and the sea realm of Ondine are expressed here with remarkably novel pianistic effects."


 

 

 

 

Professor Wolfgang Zill

Frédéric Otterbach

Germany

Friday, 23 September 2022

14:00 - 14:30

 

Biography

 

Frédéric Otterbach was born on 6 March 1998 in Schwäbisch Hall.

He received his first piano lessons at the age of 6 from Katharina Hayer. In 2005 he switched to Fedra Blido's class.

In 2013 he passed the entrance exam for the Pre-College at the Hochschule für Musik in Würzburg and became a junior student of Prof. András Hamary. After graduating from high school in 2016, Frédéric studied artistic piano with Prof. András Hamary at the HfM Würzburg and graduated with a Bachelor's degree in 2020. Since October 2020 he has been studying in the Master's programme in the class of Prof. Silke-Thora Matthies.

Frédéric Otterbach attended numerous master classes in Germany and abroad with Volker & Hans-Peter Stenzel, Bernd Glemser, Christiane Karajeva, Martin Stadtfeld, Laslo Borbély, Robert D. Levin, among others. Gerald Fauth, Bernd Goetzke, Alexander Schimpf, Marta Gulyàs, Nina Tichmann, Wolfgang Manz and Alan Weiss.

His participation in the Jugend musiziert competition has brought him 11 first prizes, including a first national prize (piano four-hands), two second national prizes (chamber music and solo) and a sponsorship prize for outstanding performance at the Baden-Württemberg state competition in 2014 for piano solo.

He also devotes himself to chamber music in various combinations. In 2015 he received a scholarship for chamber music with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. His contribution was broadcast on the radio on BR Klassik.

2017 and 2018 In the series "Young Master Pianists" at the Steingräber Piano Manufactory in Bayreuth with.

He is also particularly interested in the performance of contemporary music. For example, he participated several times in the Days of New Music at the Hochschule für Musik in Würzburg in a wide variety of instrumentations and performed the piano trio "Traumes Wirren" by Klaus Ospald there and as part of the project "Sounds der Zukunft" in Coburg together with Nina Janßen-Deinzer, among others.

 

Concert programme

 

Preludes and fugues from the baroque to the modern era

 

  • Dmitri Schostakowitsch (1906-1975): Preludes and Fugues, Op. 87 No. 24
  • Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750): Prelude and Fugue in C-sharp minor, BWV 873
  • Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809-1847): Prelude and Fugue, Op. 35 No.1

 

"Prelude and fugue is a musical form steeped in tradition that traces its origins back to before Johann Sebastian Bach. However, it only became known through Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier, who - like Dmitri Shostakovich - dedicated a prelude and fugue to each key in major and minor, (albeit arranged in fifths instead of chromatically).

For Shostakovich, it was one of his greatest works after his denunciation in 1948. This musical form often exudes a striking character of overcoming difficult times in an irrepressible determination and single-mindedness, with much slower themes than one finds in Bach's work. Yet the connection to the Well-Tempered Clavier can hardly be concealed; the genesis of Shostakovich's work is directly linked to hearing Bach's work performed by pianist Tatiana Nikolayeva in the International Bach Competition, which is musically recognizable, among other things, by some recurring Baroque motifs.

Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy also hardly hides his affection for Bach. Thus, the chorale at the end of the fugue is based on a different Bach chorale for each phrase."


 

 

 

 

Professor Wolfgang Zill

Zikai Zhang

China

Friday, 23 September 2022

14:30 - 15:00

 

Biography

 

Zikai Zhang was born in Fujian, China.

When he was 4 years old, he already received his first piano lessons from Ms. Qiu Li.

In 2009, he won the first prize in the 4th Toyama Asian Youth Competition in the category Superior Chinese Compositions.

In 2010, he won the Golden Prize in Chinese HAILUN Piano Competition, both in the categories Piano Duo and Chinese Composition.

Since 2011 he was a private student of Prof. Danning Zhang and since 2014 he changed to Prof. Bin Li.

Since 2015 he studied with Ms. Yao Lu.

In 2016, he started his Bachelor studies at the Mozarteum University, Salzburg and studied in the class of Prof. Gereon Kleiner.

In 2017, he received the First Prize in the Salzburg Prima la Musica regional competition in the chamber music category for piano IV.

In 2021, after receiving a "very good" for his final exam in the bachelor's programme in piano, he continued his master's studies in the class of Prof. Gereon Kleiner at Mozarteum.

In October 2021, he began his Bachelor's degree in piano (artistic-pedagogical direction) at the University of Music and Theatre in Munich.

In 2022, he received the Second Prize in Franz Liszt Center International Piano Competition (Category E).

He has received master classes from Prof. Klaus Kaufmann, Prof. Thomas Böckheler, Prof. Galina Vracheva, Prof. Michael Schäfer, Prof. Igor Cognolato and Prof. Emmanuel Mericer. He has also received chamber music lessons from Prof. Andreas Groethuysen, Prof. Cordelia Höfer-Teutsch and Prof. Tünde Kurucz.

 

Concert programme

 

Self-destruction

 

  • Alexander Nikolajewitsch Skrjabin (1872-1915): Piano Sonata Nr. 6
  • Maurice Ravel (1875-1937): La valse M.72

"The power of music is endless. Composers use the powerful expressiveness of music to convey their thoughts and feelings. The two works in this programme lead to destruction, either an ideological or a social one:

Scriabin composed his 6th Piano Sonata in 1911/12. Fearing the darkness of the work, the composer never performed this sonata in public. Full of mystical and terrifying power, this work showed how a dream takes shape, how horror emerges and how this nightmarish spell seduces us, musicians and listeners, through a mad dance into the endless dark abyss.

From Scriabin's darkness, the music leads to another scene: "a huge hall with countless people whirling in circles [...] An imperial residence circa 1855". But is it just a fancy ball? Ravel wrote this piece after experiencing the cruelty of war. Beneath the splendid mask lies a crisis. In the glorious extravagance we saw a disintegrating Habsburg dynasty, and it eventually led to the terrible shooting in Sarajevo in June 1914."


 

 

 

 

Professor Wolfgang Zill

Maria Khokhlova

Russia

Friday, 23 September 2022

16:00 - 16:30

 

Biography

 

Maria Khokhlova was born 05.07.1991 in Ekaterinburg, Russia. She graduated with honors from the Special Music School and Ural College of Music. She studied piano with professor Alexej Boukreev.

Currently, she is studying at the Hochschule für Musik Franz Liszt in Weimar with Prof. Gerlinde Otto.

 During the years of her studies, she became the winner of various national and international competitions and festivals, such as Amadeus International Piano Competition (1st prize, Czech Republic), the first Europe-Asia International Piano Competition (1st prize and special prize, Russia), 7 International Piano Competition Nikolai Rubinstein (3rd prize, Franc), the International Piano Competition Seiler (4 prize and diploma, Greece), International Piano Competition Ricardo Vines (Spain) (2nd prize) and others.  In 2018, she received the speсial prize for the best performance of classical sonata at the International Franz Liszt piano competition with opportunity to play solo recital on the Liszt’s piano at 17 Bayreuther Klavierfestival in summer 2019, in 2019 she received Medaile of the Ville Epinal at the Epinal piano competition and was semifinalist of Ettore Pozzoli piano competition, in 2021 she was chosen to participate at Queen Elisabeth piano competition in Brussels.

Maria Khokhlova participated in masterclasses with Mikhail Voskresensky, Imre Rohman, Aquilles delle Vigne, Natalia Trull, Grigory Gruzman, Eberhard Feltz and others. 

Maria Khokhlova regularly gives concerts in the cities of Russia and Germany. She performed with Ural State Conservatory Orchestra, Orchestra "Liceym Camerata".

Maria is also a chamber musician. In 2011, she founded "Klaviertrio Ekaterinburg", and performs with Marina Zakharova (violin) and Anastasia Chernukhina (cello). Klaviertrio Ekaterinburg is participant of the international music festivals in Yekaterinburg, St. Petersburg, Moscow, Kazan, and the cities of Germany. 2014-2016 they were studying at the Hochschule für Musik Hanns Eisler in Berlin in the class of prof. Eberhard Feltz. They are diplomants of the First All-Russian Music Competition in Moscow (2011), and the first prize winners of the International Maria Yudina Competition, Saint-Petersbourg, Russia (2013). Their repertoire includes works by Beethoven, Mozart, Haydn, Hummel, Brahms, Mendelssohn, Smetana, Rakhmaninov, Shausson, Dmitriy Shostakovich, Georgy Sviridov, Boris Tchaikovsky, Franck Martin, Mauricio Kagel, and others. 

 

 

Concert programme

 

Inspired by opera

 

  • Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849): Variations brillantes on 'Je vends des scapulaires' from Hérold's Ludovic in B-Flat Major Op 12
  • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791): Six variations on the aria "Salve, tu Domine" from the opera "I filosofi immaginarii" from Giovanni Paisiello KV398
  • Franz Liszt (1811-1886): Concert Waltz on two themes from Lucia and Parisina (Donizetti), S401

 

"For my first round programme, I have chosen three rather rarely played pieces that have one thing in common - they are all essentially "composed improvisations" or "variations" on themes from opera music. 

 

 As early as the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, many famous masters of the lute, piano and organ could improvise for hours on a popular theme, discovering ever new shades and colours in its sound. Thus, a form of variation (or cycle of variations) emerged based on the statement of the theme and its subsequent mutant repetitions. A variation is essentially a form of improvisation that gives the composer great freedom and at the same time has inner laws. However capricious and varied the facture, and however much the ear is captivated by the novelty of the registers and the harmonic colouring, one will recognize in each variation, if not the theme, at least its outlines. 

The brilliant variations of Chopin's Op. 12 were written by Chopin after his early Nocturnes and Études, in the same year as his first Ballade. At that time, bravura, virtuoso piano playing prevailed, and in his variations Chopin paid tribute to the "fashion" on the one hand, but on the other hand he did so in his own unique, unmistakable style. Arthur Loesser called the work a "masterpiece in itself", while Liszt wrote in his "Notes" that it was one of his favourite works by Chopin.

 

Mozart's variations combine a wealth of fantasy and stylish elegance to create joyful music-making. On his concert tours, Mozart earned rapturous applause for his improvisations. His variation movements were written as a direct reaction to these extempore performances, relying mainly on the substance of the theme and its pianistic embellishment. 

Thus, in the variations on "Salve, tu Domine", Mozart's rich imagination and gift for improvisation combine with his virtuosity. This piece remains close to the aria in the first three variations, then increasingly becomes an extended cadenza improvisation in the central minor variation.

Liszt's Concert Waltz on themes from Donizetti's operas Lucia and Parisina is an example of the composer's originality and uniqueness. He wrote many variations and paraphrases on themes by other composers. This waltz is unusual in that Liszt not only develops two different themes at the same time, but also combines them - for example, two themes sound simultaneously (in the right and left hands) in the virtuoso coda."


 

 

 

 

Professor Wolfgang Zill

Mikheil Kandashvili

Georgia

Friday, 23 September 2022

16:30 - 17:00

 

Biography

 

"This boy lives with the music and in the music. He has the courage that is absolutely necessary for an artist." - Elizbar Lomdaridze Georgian composer.

Misho Kandashvili captivates with his combination of delicacy and power, breathtaking technique and musical sensitivity. Born in Tbilisi, Georgia, at the age of 9, he received his first piano lessons. Misho Kandashvili graduated from the Tbilisi Central Music School in 2012 with Prof. Mzia Gogashvili.

Since autumn 2012 he has been a student at the Vienna Conservatory of Music and Dramatic Arts, in the class of Prof. Tamara Atschba. In years of intensive joint work, he developed a large repertoire and gained a deep understanding of different styles and composers. In 2014 and 2015 he was invited to solo recitals at the Festival l'Eté Musical en Bergerac France. In 2016, he will give a recital with an Austro-Georgian programme in the Bösendorfer Hall at the Mozarthaus in Vienna.

During his years of study he also participates in master classes and works several times with the well-known pianists Elisabeth Leonskaja, Lilya Silberstein, Paul Lewis, Jean-Bernard Pommier, Misho is a laureate of numerous national competitions. Performed a recital at the Blüthner Centre in Vienna in autumn 2018 with great success. In spring 2019 he is first prize winner of the ProArt competition. His relationship with the piano and music is sharp, warm and genuine and always offers his audience a great richness of emotions and colours. He has signed a contract for his first CD with the label Bella Musica/Thorofon Germany in summer 2021.

Official release of Misho Kandashvili's debut album on april 15, 2022 by Thorofon/Bella Musica! 

 

Concert programme

 

PianoForte And Time

 

  • Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750): Prelude and Fugue in A minor (WTK, Book II, No. 20)
  • Franz Liszt (1811-1886): Transcendental Étude No. 10 in F minor
  • Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849): Scherzo Op.20 No.1 in B minor 
  • Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750): Prelude Ich ruf zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ BWV 639

 

"Please, let me introduce the Program for my 1st Tour that I’d like to take you to a journey with to the 2 different epochs, emphasizing at the same time the true versatility of keyboard instruments, their limitless capabilities.

 

The composers whose works I am going to perform are - Bach, Liszt, Chopin, and - at the end of the program still - Bach.

 

Although, the very instrument of the Bach’s time - the harpsichord - is completely different with its mechanics and sound from the 18th century keyboard instruments, the time has shown the piano perfectly suits to the pieces created by Bach for the harpsichord. The final work of my program, Prelude for Organ, is a bright example for that. 

 

It should be also pointed out that performing Bach's music on a modern piano also requires an exceptional skill. The main task is to maintain the very specifics of the harpsichord – sound of which is emitted not by just hammering on the strings, but by plucking the plectrum upon them. This essence and tradition must be maintained by a performer to a certain extent. That can only be reached by fingers virtuosity and articulation, as well imaginary pedaling and intuitive feeling.

 

But these all are just details, above of which does hover a genius, harmonious, and melodically perfect music. When this music begins coming to life – it makes us completely forget in what time and for which instrument it was created.

 

Chopin and Liszt of the Romantic period are contemporaries of each other. With them, expressive capabilities of the modern piano are truly expanding. That's why I have chosen Liszt's Étude Nr. 10 which is overwhelmed by technical difficulties and emotional intensity. It could be said, musically it is a study in pushing melodic lines to the razor’s edge with passion and dramaticism while maintaining the melody.

 

Scherzo No. 1 - rhythmically, this ultimately complex and expressive work, written by Chopin just in the age of 21, clearly shows the composer's romantic nature. The form or the piece A-B-A-Coda and its repetitive structure, in my view, is one of the most important phenomena in musical dramaturgy. During the course of the work, the same musical line undergoes a complete transformation. This is how the Coda is formed. This structure first reaches its pinnacle of emotional tension, and then - like an uncontrollably falling wave - descends from this height through colourful passages. In contrast, the middle part B, is a very melodic, where main line lasts up to16 bars, yet remaining its continuity and diversity.

 

Finally, I am still coming back to J.S. Bach. As mentioned above, I am proposing his masterpiece - Prelude for Organ that forms the crowning end of my Program. The prelude written originally for the organ is performed on bass-pedal and 2 manuals. However, in case of the piano performance, we have 3 layers: the bass, the middle alto, and the melody line. By that is being created, in my opinion, one of the most beautiful musical works ever written."


 

 

 

 

Professor Wolfgang Zill

Chiara Biagioli

Italy

Friday, 23 September 2022

15:00 - 15:30

 

Biography

 

Prize winner of many National and International competitions, Chiara Biagioli  combines her versatile artistry as a soloist, chamber musician, collaborative artist and teacher.

In November 2021, she won the 3rd prize at the Humberto Quagliata International Competition and debuted with the Instabile Orchestra of Arezzo conducted by maestro J.F.Antonioli with the Mozart concerto KV 415. In 2018, she performed as a soloist with Archi De Sono and in 2019 she made her own debut in North America performing Mozart's Piano Concerto KV 488 with the Colburn Orchestra (Los Angeles), conducted by B. Manis.

Ms. Biagioli has performed extensively throughout Europe and North America, including debuts in venues such as Zipper Hall and Thayer Hall in Los Angeles and Steinway Hall in Beverly Hills, Vittoria Theatre, Carignano Theatre, Auditorium Orpheus, Villa Tesoriera in Turin. Her touring schedule has taken her to the Music Academy in Pinerolo, La Fenice Theatre in Venice, Vatican Museum in Rome, Salle Empire in the Principality of Monaco, Poppelsdorfer Schloss in Bonn, Rubinstein Musik Akademie and Koenigsallee in Duesseldorf, Hochschule fuer Musik und Tanz in Cologne and Schloss Laudon in Vienna.

Featured in many Festivals such as Unione Musicale, Polincontri Classica and Mozart Nacht und Tag in Turin, European Young Artists Festival in Mondovi, Beethovenfest in Bonn, Klassische Soirée auf der Koeln in Duesseldorf, Klaviernacht in Cologne, Kulturverein Linusreisen und Linuskultur in Mondovi and the European Music Institute in Vienna.

In 2021, she is the only Italian semifinalist at Livorno International Piano Competition and top prizewinner at the Ducale.lab in Vercelli; in 2017 at the A. Rubinstein International Piano Competition in Duesseldorf, among others.

Committed to engaging with his surrounding community, Ms. Biagioli regularly performs for Public Benefit Organizations at schools, hospitals and retirement homes, and she is engaged in teaching and providing musical education to the young generation. She was awarded the Melvin Jones Fellow and the Certificate of appreciation by Dr. Jung-Yul Choi, President of the Lions Club International, as a symbol of the deep commitment in supporting humanitarian projects through music.

She graduated in May 2022, earning her Professional Study Certificate degree at the Colburn School in Los Angeles (US) with Fabio Bidini. She previously earned her Master degree in Piano Performance at the Hochschule fuer Musik und Tanz in Cologne (Germany) with F. Bidini and her Bachelor degree with the highest grades and honours at the G. Verdi Conservatory in Turin (Italy) with Claudio Voghera.

 

Concert programme

 

The Road to Jazz

 

  • Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750): Goldberg Variations- Aria, Variations, 1, 7, 4, 5 
  • Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849): Nocturne, op.37 no.1 
  • Claude Debussy (1862-1918): From Preludes Book 1: La fille aux cheveux de lin 
  • George Gershwin (1898-1937): 3 Preludes 
  • Friedrich Gulda (1930-2000): Play Piano Play Nr 9,6 Toccata 

 

"Let's take a journey through the development of Jazz, from its genesis in the 18th century to being one of the most popular forms of music in the 20st! Starting from Bach’s Goldberg Variations we can see a piece unified by a 32-bar chord progression, just like any standard jazz chart. Composers like Chopin and Debussy wrote music that would inspire many jazz ballades from a melodic and harmonic standpoint. Finally, we end up with 3 Preludes and two pieces of Play Piano Play, finishing our trip with George Gershwin and  Friederch Gulda, both deeply in love with the free spirits of jazz as with the living monuments of classical; they were able to compose iconic pieces based on a excellent combination of jazz and classical elements in a perfect harmony."



PRELIMINARY ROUND DAY TWO

 

 

 

 

Ryohong Ahn

South Korea

Saturday, 24 September 2022

09:00 - 09:30

 

Biography

 

The pianist Ryohong Ahn was born in South Korea. 

She began her artistic education at Yewon Arts Middle School and Seoul Arts High School.

She then successfully completed her Bachelor's degree at Yonsei University -Seoul, graduating with the highest honours in 2015.

From 2017 to 2019, she completed her Master's degree with Prof. Detlef Kaiser at the Dresden University of Music and since 2019 she has continued studying for the Master Class Examination. 

During this time, she participated in various competitions and won numerous prizes in Korea. 

She also took 2nd prize at the Mahler Competition in Prague and special prize for Liszt and participated in the Liszt Competition in Hungary in 2021.

She also performed with Dresden Sinfonietta as a soloist and played "L.V Beethoven Concerto No.3". 

 

Concert programme

 

Bagatelles in three different eras

 

  • François Couperin (1668-1733): Les Bagatelle
  • Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827): 7 Bagatelles, Op. 33
  • Carl Vine (*1954): 5 Bagatelle

 

"A bagatelle is a short piece of music, typically for piano, and usually light, mellow in character.  

The name Bagatelle literally means "a short unpretentious instrumental composition" as a reference to a piece's light style, and the length of the work also varies.

For the program of the first round, I have chosen three songs from different eras on the subject of bagatelle. 

The program consists of Couperin's Bagatelle, the first to bear the name Bagatelle, Beethoven's Bagatelle, which is best known to the public, and Carl Vine's Bagatelles, a contemporary composer.

In particular, Beethoven composed short pieces in the bagatelle style throughout his life while writing other large works, which is why his Bagatelle is more representatively known.

Through these three works, I want to show the difference in the musical style of each of the three eras, beyond Bagatelle's light and short personality."


 

 

 

 

Lorenzo Mazzola

Italy

Saturday, 24 September 2022

09:30 - 10:00

 

Biography

 

Lorenzo Mazzola, born on 28 September 1995 in Bergamo, began piano lessons at the age of five. After the classical baccalaureate, he graduated from the Conservatorio Gaetano Donizetti in Bergamo in 2020 with top marks under the direction of M. Giovanetti and M. Motterle. Despite a $45,000 scholarship from the Mannes College of Music in New York, he preferred to stay in Europe and moved to Germany the following year to complete his studies.

He is currently attending the concert exam course at the HfMDK in Frankfurt am Main with Maestro O. Kern.

He has been a finalist or prize-winner in numerous scholarships and international piano competitions, including the Barbisotti Scholarship - UBIBanca in Bergamo, the Baldi Competition in Bologna and the Liszt Competition in Parma, where he also won several special prizes, including one for the best performance of the compulsory piece: Liszt's Sonata in B minor. 

He has performed in major halls - Teatro Donizetti and Creberg in Bergamo, Gaber Auditorium in Milan, Teatro Regio in Parma, Pilgrimage Church in Mariazell (Austria), HfMDK Concert Hall in Frankfurt (Germany), Lithuanian National Philharmonic in Vilnius (Lithuania). 

He has performed at the Brescia and Bergamo Piano Festivals, the Verdi Festival of Parma, the Società dei Concerti of Milan, the Festival dell'Emilia Romagna and the Vilnius Piano Festival. As a soloist he has collaborated with important soloists and orchestras - the Orchestra Arturo Toscanini dell'Emilia Romagna and the Orchestra sinfonica di Chioggia, under the conductors M° S. Percacciolo and M° C. Perini. Some of his concerts have been recorded by national and local radio stations, and many of them have received rave reviews in the press.

He has attended master classes with eminent pianists including M° Dmitri Alexeev, Jerome Rose, Pavel Gililov and Konstantin Bogino. He has collaborated, including in concerts, with eminent musicians such as Antonio Ballista.

In 2013, at the age of seventeen, he was selected by the Conservatorio Donizetti in Bergamo to record a Liszt study for Sony Classical Talent Scout.

In addition to his intense concert activity, he taught piano at the Accademia Santa Cecilia in Bergamo for several years.

 

Concert programme

 

The music of Stalin

 

  • Dmitri Dmitrijewitsch Schostakowitsch (1906-1975): Prelude and fugue in D minor, Op. 87 No. 24
  • Sergei Sergejewitsch Prokofjew (1891-1953): Sonata in B-flat Major, Op. 83 No. 7
    • Allegro inquieto
    • Andante caloroso
    • Precipitato

 

"It is difficult to find a darker historical period than the first half of the last century for Europe and the world. The period between the two wars and, let us say, up to '53 (death of Stalin), is par excellence the age of totalitarianisms. But what is still not always clear or remembered today is that it was not a mere chase after individual power (which has occurred countless times throughout history), but a genuine (abominable) attempt at a Cultural Revolution that, starting conceptually from the exciting industrial production efficiency of the late 19th century and, consequently, from certain clearly identifiable artistic movements (e.g. futurism), consisted in founding a new mentally and physically efficient man through an obsessive control of every aspect of the individual's private and public life. 

All totalitarianisms share this fundamental aspect, albeit with due differences, but none have ever reached such a level of macabre perfectionism as Stalin, even in the field of music. Despite or perhaps because of this, Russian music of those years has known an intensity that is difficult to match.

This is the theme behind the first programme I would like to present, based on the two greatest musicians of the time who chose to stay in Russia, Dmitri Shostakovich and Sergei Prokofiev. Two very different musicians whose music has an importance, as well as artistic, historical and political, like few others. 

The Prelude and Fugue in D minor op. 87 no. 24, the last in the collection, is an imposing, tragic and ironic piece, hopelessly but forcibly optimistic (a theme typical of the composer). The fundamental motif of the fugue, already presented in the prelude, is repeated continuously with an obsessive crescendo culminating in a D major, the key with which the piece closes, but the triumphant close is mourned by the triumphal is mourned in a deformed smile by the diminished sixth (B flat).

Different is the character of Prokofiev's Sonata in B flat, divided into three movements, the first restless in character, the second dreamy (but with elements of nightmare) and the third, unlike Shostakovich's fugue, inexorable, at times sarcastic, and authentically triumphant. The Sonata, one of the three defined as 'war', has been nicknamed (not by the author) Stalingrad, and with its 

visionary and apocalyptic character effectively represents this crucial battle."


 

 

 

 

Florian Altwegg

Switzerland

Saturday, 24 September 2022

10:00 - 10:30

 

Biography

 

Florian Altwegg was born in Biel/Bienne and grew up in a home where chamber music was regularly played and performed. At the age of three, he discovered playing the piano on his father's instrument by copying melodies he heard. He then received piano lessons from Iris Haefely at the Biel Music School for several years, where his musical talent was encouraged. He then entered the talent promotion class at the Hofwil grammar school in Münchenbuchsee and, at the same time, completed a bachelor's degree at the Bern University of the Arts in Pierre Sublet's piano class. After an interim phase of several years, during which he devoted himself to a wide variety of activities in Switzerland and abroad, he completed his music pedagogy studies with Wilhem Latchoumia at the Bern University of the Arts in June 2020. 

 

Florian Altwegg completed master classes with influential personalities such as Dmitri Bashkirov, Homero Francesch, Martin Hughes, Tobias Schabenberger and Paul Coker. He achieved successes at the Swiss Youth Music Competition, among others, at the final round of which he received 1st prize with distinction and special prizes for outstanding interpretations of contemporary works in 2009. This was followed by successes at international piano competitions, including as a semi-finalist at the Premio "Silvio Bengalli" in Italy (2019).

 

Florian Altwegg has a special interest in the music of the 20th and 21st centuries and in composers from Latin-speaking countries. He cultivates a repertoire that spans a variety of eras, from baroque to postmodern. 

 

Concert programme

 

Dances of the Romance language

 

  • Béla Bartók (1881-1945): Romanian Dances, op. 8a - No. 1
  • Miquel Asins Arbó (1916-1996): Flamenco - I Solea, II Petenera Antigua, III Zorongo
  • Alberto Ginastera (1916-1983): Piano Sonata No. 3 op. 54

 

"The programme is a journey through different folk music of the Romance language and consists mainly of dance music from Latin-speaking countries. The integration of folk music with rhythms and harmonies that are partly foreign to us into classical composition is a high art to which I would like to dedicate this programme. 

The journey begins in Eastern Europe with the music of Bela Bartók, who is of Hungarian origin and thus did not grow up with a Romance language, but during his musical work dealt a lot with Romanian folk music. Of course, the Spanish-speaking countries belong to the same language family, and we take a look at Andalusia, where flamenco is still a popular and much-lived dance and music heritage. This kind of music is rarely found in classical literature. M. Asins Arbó has written a wonderful suite for piano in which different facets of flamenco music are highlighted in three movements. The programme will conclude with music by the Argentinian composer Alberto Ginastera. Throughout his life, he has been intensively involved with the folk music of his culture. The third piano sonata is his last work, which he completed virtually from his deathbed. The work seems to be much more complex in its harmonies than his early works such as the much-performed Danzas Argentinas op. 2 and gives the impression of a certain confusion, only to end in C major. The composer takes his leave with the written words "Deo gratia" (Thanks to God) under the last bar."


 

 

 

 

Georg Kjurdian

Latvia

Saturday, 24 September 2022

11:00 - 11:30

 

Biography

 

Georg Kjurdian was born in Riga in 1994. He received piano and composition lessons (from Pēteris Vasks) at the Emīls-Dārziņš Music High School there. He then came to Germany to begin his piano studies at the Robert Schumann Hochschule in Düsseldorf with Barbara Szczepanska. He completed his Master's degree in Professional Performance at the Folkwang University of the Arts in Essen with Hisako Kawamura. This was followed by studies with Arnulf von Arnim at the Musikhochschule Münster. Since 2021, Georg Kjurdian has been studying in the "Instrumental Duo with Pianist" programme at the Folkwang University of the Arts with Evgeni Sinaiski.

He received further important impulses from master classes by Jacques Rouvier, Dmitri Baschkirow, Jan Wijn, Pavel Gililov, Imogen Cooper and Stephen Kovacevich, among others. His concert activities have taken him to concert halls such as the Jahrhunderthalle (Bochum), the Robert-Schumann-Saal (Düsseldorf), the Rhein-Mosel-Halle (Koblenz), the Gewandhaus zu Leipzig, Die Glocke (Bremen) and the Mercatorhalle (Duisburg). He has recorded for Latvian Radio (2009, 2015), WDR3 (2012, 2013) and MDR Figaro (2014). 

Georg Kjurdian is a prizewinner/scholarship recipient of both national and international competitions and sponsors; these include: International Rachmaninov Piano Competition for Young Pianists (Frankfurt/Main, 2013, 3rd prize), Werner Richard - Dr. Carl Dörken Foundation (2013), Gen Re Promotion Scholarship 2014 for Young Soloists, Scholarship of the Cultural Foundation "Wasserburg zum Haus" (Ratingen, 2014/15), International Johann Sebastian Bach Competition (Leipzig, 2014, 3rd prize, Audience Prize), Carl-Heinz Foundation (2014/15). Prize, Audience Award), Carl-Heinz Illies-Förderstipendium der Deutschen Stiftung Musikleben (2015), International Bachelor Piano Award (2016, 1st prize), Köhler-Osbahr Competition (2017, 1st prize). In 2021, he was nominated for "The Great Music Award Latvia" together with violinist Magdalena Geka. 

Georg Kjurdian also regularly plays newer and newest music, for example the world premiere of a work by the young Latvian composer Linda Leimane. 

 

Concert programme

 

The story of the preludes and fugues, told from back to front

 

  • Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975): Prelude and Fugue in E minor, op. 87 No. 4
  • Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdi (1809-1847): Prelude and Fugue in E minor, op. 35 No. 1
  • Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750): Prelude and Fugue in E flat minor BWV 853 from The Well-Tempered Clavier Volume I

 

"Polyphony is a compositional technique that was particularly popular from the Middle Ages to the 18th century. In this music, each voice is meant to have equal rights; the terms such as secondary voice and accompanying voice do not even come into question. This creates a kind of musical democracy that probably did not yet exist in the society of the time. After a long development of forms, the term "fugue" finally comes into play (not until the 17th century). This is a musical principle of composition where basically there is a theme which is performed by one voice at the beginning of the piece (all the other voices remain silent) and later makes an exciting journey through the other voices. In the development, when the theme has been a guest of all the voices, various metamorphoses occur - the theme is shown slower or faster, in different registers, sometimes several themes sound at the same time or even - there appears a second theme! After such an exciting development, one often hears the organ point (a sustained bass). This should serve as a signal, warning us of the climax, where hopefully the conflict that has arisen in the piece is finally released. 

Often, the fugue together with a prelude make a small two-movement cycle. In the Baroque period, however, it was customary to improvise a prelude at church services or on other festive occasions. Musically, this usually shorter piece has a much simpler structure than the fugue, and thus serves as a free emotional introduction to the strict and often somewhat more detached world of the fugue.

This programme features three preludes and fugues from three different centuries - the cycle by Shostakovich dates from the 1950s, 6 preludes and fugues by Mendelssohn op. 35 were composed between 1832 and 1837, and the first volume of Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier was composed in 1722. In between, there are 100 years in each case. Why have I taken the exact order? Each century has different ideas and therefore different means of expression. But the fact that composers always return to the Well-Tempered Clavier only means that Bach said something so important at that time, in the 18th century, that it is essential to return to it at least once in 100 years. This sequence is also a kind of coming back. To Bach, who still sounds so fresh and modern today, after exactly 300 years."


 

 

 

 

Tsuzumi Namikawa

Japan

Saturday, 24 September 2022

11:30 - 12:00

 

Biography

 

Tsuzumi Namikawa, born in 1997 in Asahikawa, Japan, received her first piano lessons at the age of five. In 2012, she moved to Braunschweig with her family and took piano lessons with Prof. Wolfgang Zill. She is currently studying at the Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media in the piano class of Prof. Ewa Kupiec and has won several prizes at national and international competitions. Her latest successes include 1st prize at the International Piano Prize "Napolinova", Naples in May 2022. At the international competition "Münchner Klavierpodium der Jugend" she was awarded ten prizes in total. In 2014, she won 1st prize at the Carl Bechstein Competition in Berlin together with her piano duo partner Nina Ding. In 2019, she won 2nd prize at the "International Competition PianoTalents" in Milan. Tsuzumi Namikawa was twice awarded the Louis-Spohr-Jugend- Musikförderpreis of the city of Braunschweig and enriched the cultural life of the region in several concerts. Concerts have taken her beyond the borders of Germany to Switzerland, Austria, Finland and Japan. She received further artistic impulses from Akiko Ebi, Alexei Lubimov and Konstanze Eickhorst, among others.

 

Concert programme

 

The night side of the soul 

 

  • Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849): Nocturne B Major, Op. 62 No. 1
  • Jörg Widmann (*1973): Aus Elf Humoresken
    • Lied im Traume
    • Mit Humor und Feinsinn
  • Jean Sibelius (1865-1957): Reverie, Op. 58 No. 1
  • Sergei Sergejewitsch Prokofjew (1891-1953)
    • Reminiscence, Op. 4 No. 1
    • Suggestion diabolique, Op. 4 No. 4
  • Paul Hindemith (1895-1963): Nachtstück aus "Suite 1922"

 

"Silence reigns, stars and moon twinkle in the dark sky, it is time to relax - But at the same time, these night hours allow us to sink deeper into our thoughts. 

This ambivalence can be felt in F. Chopin's Nocturne. It not only creates a calm, discreet atmosphere of the night, but is also associated with emotionally deep sensations and inner shocks. 

When one closes one's eyes afterwards, one is caught up in a wide variety of dreams, ranging from sweet reminiscences to hellish nightmares. As a mirror of the soul, one unconsciously dreams of the past. In J. Widmann's humoresques, gentle memories of R. Schumann's phrases collide with distorted outbursts. 

Dreams are often said to have the character of divination or oracles. For a long time, the belief prevailed that dreams were indirect or coded messages from gods and demons, as the devil whispers to one in Prokofiev's Suggestion diabolique.

In Hindemith's "Nachtstück", the uncanny is set to music in the darkness until a trace of dawn can be heard in the last bars."


 

 

 

 

Andrey Denisenko

Russia

Saturday, 24 September 2022

12:00 - 12:30

 

Biography

 

Andrey Denisenko was born into a family of musicians. He began playing the piano at a very young age. Andrey won several prizes at various competitions, including first prize in the Pavel Serebryakov International Piano Competition in Volgograd in 2010, second prize in the VIII International Piano Competition «Der Schritt zur Meisterschaft» in Saint Petersburg in 2011, and first prize in the Stanislav Neuhaus Piano Competition in Chelyabinsk in 2016. He played with conductors such as Edward Serov, Stanislav Kochanovsky, Anatoly Rybalko, Alexander Soloviev, Jury Tkachenco, Alexander Mileikovsky, Benjamin Bayl and Christian Kunnert. Andrey participated in master classes with Dmitry Bashkirov, Eliso Virsaladze, Ragna Schirmer, Konstantin Lifschitz, Andrey Diev, Arcady Sevidof, Matti Raekallio, Vincenzo Balzani. 

In 2014, he participated in the international festival «The faces of modern pianism» in Mariinsky Concert Hall (St. Petersburg, Russia). 

Since 2017 Andrey is a scholarship holder of "Live Music Now" Hamburg. In 2018, he won the third prize in the European Piano Competition Bremen, the first prize in the competition «Elise Meyer Stiftung Hamburg» and Steinway Förderpreis Klassik 2018. Since April 2018 he is a scholarship holder of the Oscar and Vera Ritter Foundation. On 29 June 2018 he made his debut with Harvestehude Sinfonieorchester Hamburg under the baton of Prof. Christian Kunnert in the great hall of Laeiszhalle. In 2019 Andrey made his debut in Japan, playing solo concerts in Tokyo and elsewhere. In August 2019 he won the Grand Prix in International Festival & Competition "Grand Piano in Palace" in St. Petersburg. As part of the project "Junge Künstler aus Norden" in cooperation with NDR Hamburg, Andrey recorded works by Robert Schumann and Johannes Brahms - both solo and with the baritone Geng Lee. Since 2020 Andrey has been active in the concert series «Weltklassik am Klavier» and plays concerts in various cities in Germany. In August 2020, as part of the festival «Classic@Home», he played in a trio with Alexander Buzlov and Alissa Margulis. 

In 2022 Andrey made his debut in the small hall of the Elbphilharmonie and chamber music hall of the Philharmonie Berlin. 

Andrey enjoyed a high-calibre education in concert piano. He graduated with highest honours from the Hochschule für Musik und Theater in Hamburg and is currently studying concert piano with Prof. Anna Vinnitskaya. 

 

Concert programme

 

Two Chaconnes - Two Tragedies 

 

  • Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750): Chaconne d-minor BWV 1004 for the left hand alone
    • Transcription: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
  • Sofia Asgatowna Gubaidulina (*1931): Chaconne

 

"«The Chaconne is for me one of the most wonderful, incomprehensible pieces of music. On a system for a small instrument, the man writes a whole world of the deepest thoughts and most powerful feelings. Had I been able to make the piece, to receive it, I know for certain, the exceeding excitement and shock would have driven me mad.» - said Johannes Brahms about the Chaconne from Partita No. 2 for solo violin, BWV 1004 by Johann Sebastian Bach.

 

Nonetheless, he took up this work and made an arrangement for piano that is played with the left hand only. This is a fairly accurate, honest arrangement that is very close to the original version. 

 

The tragic mood of this piece is combined with some biographical facts from Bach's life. After a long business trip in July 1720, Bach returned home. When he arrived home, he learned that his wife, Maria Barbara Bach, had died a week ago. A little later, he composed Partita in D minor. 

 

Whether there is actually a connection - one could only assume. 

The Chaccone is a deeply human, universal, grandiose piece. 

 

Sofia Gubaidulina composed her Chaconne in 1962. 

 

«Thus the author turned to the genre of the Old French slow dance, the chaconne, which can introduce the theme of human tragedy through its majestic pace.» - said the composers' sister, Ida Gubaidullina, in her article on the chaconne. 

In the difficult post-war years, in the midst of the Cold War, the theme of the fragility of human existence was very timely. How close an apocalyptic dissolution is to our reality, how fragile this world is - Sofia Gubaidulina dealt with such questions. 

The questions are also extremely topical today."


 

 

 

 

Greta Maria Lobefaro

Italy

Saturday, 24 September 2022

14:00 - 14:30

 

Biography

 

Born on 12th October 2001, begins studying piano at five with her parents, both pianists.

She was graduated in piano at the Conservatorio di Musica "N. Piccinni" in Bari, Italy with the maximum points and with honour, in prof.ssa Giovanna Valente’s class. She attends the 2nd course at the Accademia di Santa Cecilia Roma with professor Benedetto Lupo, the Imola International Piano Accademy with professor Enrico Pace and Roberto Giordano, the contemporary piano performance practice with professor Emanuele Arciuli.

She was awarded as 1st prize in National and International Music and Piano Competitions, she was awarded in 32 competitions. 

We remember: XII Concorso pianistico internazionale "Vietri sul Mare", 1° Concorso Internazionale di esecuzione pianistica, Madesimo (SO), 1st prize and Special Romantic Prize in XX Concorso Pianistico Nazionale "G. Rospigliosi", Lamporecchio (PT), Riviera etrusca, Piombino (LI), 1st classified sez.A up to 17 at the 1st European Piano Competition – Città di Empoli, XX Concorso Internazionale per giovani Musicisti, Città di Barletta (BA), XXV Concorso Pianistico Nazionale "J. S. Bach", Sestri Levante (GE), 13th International Piano Competition "Città di Gorizia", 1st classified Concorso LIONS Bari, 1st prize award in cat. B and C VII Concorso  "Mirabello in Musica", 1st prize and winner of the 15th edition of the Concorso Pianistico Internazionale Città di Rocchetta (IS), Prize "Maria Lombardi Regine".

She also was second prize, first prize not given, and special prize "Elena Boselli" (special musical talent) at the XXVIII Concorso Pianistico Nazionale Muzio Clementi Yamaha di Lastra a Signa Firenze, competition up 24 ages in two rounds.

1st classified at the  "XXI International Fryderyk Chopin Piano Competition for children and youth", SZAFARNIA 2013, Poland. 

1st classified at the Steinway competition in Verona, Italy in 2016.

3rd classified at the International Piano competition "Città di Spoleto" (3 rounds up to 33 years old), in November 2018.

3rd classified at the XXXV Premio Venezia (Competition for the best graduated in Italy in 2017), December 2018, La Fenice theatre in Venice.

4th classified Annarosa Taddei Competition, November 2019, Accademia Filarmonica Romana, Roma (Italy) 

She was among the 12 selected young pianists all over the world to attend to the Junior Music Camp with Lang Lang, Barcellona November 2014, by Lang Lang Foundation New York and Allianz, the only one Italian, Music Ambassador in the world.

Selected among the 7 finalists at the Piano San Marino Competition 2016, VII ed., until 15 years.

When she was ten, she performed live TV at RAI 2 and debuted with orchestra. 

She had concerts in Italy, Germany, Austria, Romania, Russia, Ucraina, Swizerland, Spain, South Africa.

Masterclasses: M° Michele Marvulli (from 2012); at the Mozarteum University, Sommerakademie, in Salzburg Prof. Andreas Weber (2013, 2015), with Maestro Bruno Canino, Roberto Cappello, Francois Joel Thiollier, Benedetto Lupo, Emanuele Arciuli, Prof. Wolfram Schmitt Leonardy.

She performed in Italia, Svizzera, Ucraina, Austria, Germania, Spagna, Russia, Romania, South Africa in recital and with orchestra. 

She recorded for D Major TV in May 2018. Her 1st CD was recorded by Odradek in May 2018.

 

Concert programme

 

The sonata-form between tradition and innovation

 

  • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791): Sonata K 576
    • Allegro
    • Adagio
    • Allegretto
  • Alban Berg (1885-1935): Sonata, Op.1

 

"The sonata-form is obviously the emblematic formal architecture of Classicism, founded on clear and intelligible symmetrical and harmonic proportions. Born and developed in the second half of the eighteenth century, it reaches the peak of popularity thanks to the work of the three greats of the first Wiener Schule: Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. With the intention to give to the history of instrumental music a massive formal structure, it invades and dominates styles, genres and forms, becoming, at the same time, a model that no longer could be ignored and that would shape the centuries to come.

 

Mozart's last sonata, composed in 1789, a complex work in its apparent simplicity, can clearly document how far the sonata-form and the sonata itself had already developed in such a limited period, from Haydn to Mozart, before passing to Beethoven.

The opening Allegro in 6/8 in D major doesn’t present particular contrasting ideas between the two themes: the second one seems only to interrupt for a moment the brilliant and strong-willed course of the first. In the elaboration is evident the sophisticated contrapuntal game of Bachian style, perhaps inspired by a recent trip by Mozart to Leipzig. Within a simple tripartite lieder structure, the long melody of the Adagio unfolds, bringing us back to the echoes of Italian belcanto. The crepuscular atmosphere of the second movement is dissolved in the clear candor of the final Allegretto, a rondò based on a popular theme. Even the necessary contrasting episodes can be considered as variations and elaborations of the initial thematic idea.

 

The motivic elaboration as the essential part of the sonata-form, taken to the extreme consequences, develops kaleidoscopically on a compositional and chronological level, arriving in the Second Wiener Schule and particularly in the first production of Alban Berg. His Sonata op.1 in a single movement, with the use of an expanded tonal system and contrapuntal and coloristic techniques, constitutes the starting point for a sonata-form that had already made a long way. The Sonata actually is a first Allegro almost in sonata-form with two different themes and a refrain for the exhibition, with a tripartite structure.

The system key of the Sonata, B minor, clearly affirmed in the third bar, can be considered as the fundamental landmark and the definitive culmination of the harmonic structures of the work. The processing principle doesn’t disappear, on the contrary, changes into a logic method, based on the third chords. This substantial traditionalism is counterbalanced by an innovative piano writing, aimed at underline the abstract constructive reasons of the piece."


 

 

 

 

Jinseok Maeng

South Korea

Saturday, 24 September 2022

14:30 - 15:00

 

Biography

 

Jinseok Maeng (28) discovered his love for the piano at an early age. After years of study and degrees at the "Seoul Arts High School" and the "Seoul National University" with Prof. Hyungjoon Chang and Prof. "in Minjung Lee, Jinseok Maeng continued his studies with a master's degree with Prof. Adrian Oetiker at the ‘Hochschule für Musik und Theater München’. He has received numerous awards in Korea and has performed many solo recitals and concert performances. As a member of the ensemble he has already played on various stages in Korea, in München he is among others. Performed in the small hall in the Gasteig and in Allerheiligenkirche am Kreuz. Recently he became appointed finalist of the 'P!ano Klavierwettbewerbs in Münster'. In addition, he has participated in various music festivals such as the "Euro Arts Festival" in Leipzig, "MusikFest Piano Camp" in Minnesota and "Ticino Musica Academy" in Lugano, where he was able to gather further impulses through masterclasses with Prof. Gerald Fauth and Prof. Sontraud Speidel. Jinseok Maeng is currently studying on the ‘Konzertexamen’ course in ‘Musikhochschule Münster’ with Prof. Peter von Wienhardt.

 

Concert programme

 

Fantasia

 

  • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791): 12 Variations in C Major on "Ah, vous dirai-je Maman", K. 265/300e
  • Manuel de Falla (1876-1946): Fantasia Baetica 
  • Alexander Nikolajewitsch Skrjabin (1872-1915): Piano Sonata no.4 in F sharp Major, Op.30

 

"Fantasy not only gives composers the freedom to express their ideals and expressions, but also brings a lot of inspiration and imagination to performers. Mozart 12 variations are very familiar to us with the melody of 'Twinkle Twinkle Little Star' The 12 variations Mozart wrote from French chanson will help both the performer and the audience to paint a beautiful inner fantasy. Beatica is the old name of Andalusia, Spain, and Falla expresses this very passionately and splendidly. Scriabin's dreamy and mysterious 1st movement is directly connected to the enchanting 2nd movement. This sonata, which has a special composition of two movements, is a fantasy narrative and shows a different fantasy from the previous two pieces."


 

 

 

 

Viacheslav Shelepov

Russia

Saturday, 24 September 2022

15:00 - 15:30

 

Biography

 

Viacheslav Shelepov plays both historical and modern piano and is proficient in a wide range of musical styles. 

He has participated in major festivals including Contemporary Piano Faces in St Petersburg, Geelvinck Fortepiano Festival in Amsterdam, Trigonale Festival of Early Music in Austria, "Les Nuits Romantiques" in Verbania and Accademia di Musica Antica di Milano. He has performed in many prestigious concert halls throughout Europe, including the Piano Salon Christophori in Berlin and the Accademia Bartolomeo Cristofori in Florence.

Viacheslav Shelepov has won eight international piano and fortepiano competitions, including "Musica Antiqua" Fortepiano Competition in Bruges (=2nd prize and the Audience Prize), Rome Fortepiano International Competition "Muzio Clementi Prize" (1st prize). Prize), International Geelvinck Fortepiano Competition in Amsterdam - Stanley Hoogland Squarepiano Award (1st Prize), International Fortepiano Competition "Premio Ferrari" in Rovereto (1st Prize) and Maria Yudina International Piano Competition in Saint Petersburg (1st Prize).

Viacheslav was born in 1991 in Barnaul, where he began his musical education at the age of five. After the Altai State Music College and the Tchaikovsky Academic College of Music of the Moscow State P. I. Tchaikovsky Conservatory, Viacheslav continued his studies at the Moscow Conservatory, where he studied with Alexei Lubimov and Alexei Shevchenko (fortepiano), Alexander Mndoyants and Sergei Kasprov (piano) and Maria Uspenskaya (harpsichord). He graduated with distinction in 2016. Viacheslav is currently studying at the Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media with Zvi Meniker (fortepiano) and is preparing to graduate in the solo class after completing his Master's degree.

As a soloist and chamber musician, Viacheslav performs in various European countries such as Italy, Germany, Austria and the Netherlands.

His first CD is expected to be released in 2022.

 

Concert programme

 

Advocating non-mainstream music

 

  • Michail Iwanowitsch Glinka (1804-1857): The Separation
  • Wilhelm Friedemann Bach (1710-1784): Sonata in e, BR
  • Muzio Clementi (1752-1832): Sonata in f, op. 13 n. 6

 

"Today, in conservatory classes, in competition programmes (your competition is a wonderful exception!), and in concert halls, we often hear a certain set of compositions, appreciated by musicians and loved by the public. For this reason, little-known gems of musical literature remain in the shadows. I would like, to the best of my ability, to correct this situation.

Glinka is the father of Russian classical music and the composer of the Romantic era. The idea of his art was to combine the Russian's music colorite with developed European musical forms.

Bach's Sons music is not often heard in concert programs. They mostly remain in the shadow of the great J.S. Bach, although their music presents an amazing period in history of music - shift from Baroque to Classical era. This is so-called gallant style.

Clementi. Mozart called him "ein bloßer Mechanikus". Clementi was indeed a great virtuoso. However, was he only virtuoso? In this striking sonata, we can fully appreciate his gift as a composer and depth of feeling."


 

 

 

 

Johannes Obermeier

Germany

Saturday, 24 September 2022

16:00 - 16:30

 

Biography

 

Johannes Obermeier, born in Munich in 1998, received piano lessons from the age of five. He began learning the saxophone at the age of eight, and the trumpet three years later. 

In 2012, Johannes Obermeier was accepted as a junior student in the piano class of Prof. Olaf Dreßler and the saxophone class of Prof. Koryun Asatryan at the University of Music and Performing Arts in Munich. In addition to music, he began fulltime studies in business administration at LMU Munich in 2016, graduating with a Master's degree in March 2022. Since autumn 2019, Johannes Obermeier has also been studying composition as a major subject with Prof. Jan Müller-Wieland and piano as an artistic major subject with Prof. Adrian Oetiker at the Musikhochschule München.

Johannes Obermeier has been leading a number of ensembles for several years, supports the work with young musicians on a voluntary basis and can be heard time and again in concerts in and around Munich. He is also active as a conductor.

At the age of 7 he won a first prize at the Karl Lang Competition. At "Jugend musiziert", "Jugend komponiert" and many other competitions he won many highest prizes in the subjects saxophone, piano and composition as well as several awards and special prizes for outstanding performances. He is the winner of the Pegalogos Prize 2016, the Günter-Bialas-Förderpreis 2022 of the Bavarian Academy of Fine Arts, 2nd prize winner of the Steinway-Förderpreis 2022 as well as a scholarship holder of the Deutschlandstipendium.

Johannes Obermeier also has a special interest in chamber music. In recent years, he has been invited several times to festivals throughout Germany and has played with members of various German orchestras. His work brings him together with musicians such as Volker Banfield, Ian Bostridge, Gerold Huber, Peter Michael Hamel, Donald Sulzen, Yaron Rosenthal, Christian Lauba, Mark Andre and Minas Borboudakis.

Since winter semester 2021/22, Johannes Obermeier holds a student teaching position in accompaniment for instrumental classes as well as opera and oratorio at the Hochschule für Musik und Theater München.

 

Concert programme

 

Musical Seriousness and Jest

 

  • Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750): BWV 870, Wohltemperiertes Klavier, 2. Band, Prelude and Fugue in C major
  • Jörg Widmann (*1973): aus: 11 Humoresken: XI "Mit Humor und Feinsinn"
  • Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809-1847): Variations sérieuses op. 54
  • Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849): Étude op. 10 Nr. 5 in G-flat Major
  • Leopold Godowsky (1870-1938): Étude "Badinage"

 

"A central point of origin of music has always been that of entertainment. Although nowadays there is a strict separation between serious music and light music, this was by no means always the case. As early as the 16th century, we find musical jokes in Orlando di Lasso's Echo Chorus, for example. But there is always a spark of seriousness in joking. After all, a joke in the true sense of the word is not just a joke, but in its Latin origins an artistic playfulness. The grand master of the Baroque, Johann Sebastian Bach, was not only a master of counterpoint, but also a reconciler of serious jest and joking seriousness. The Prelude of the Second Volume of the Well-Tempered Clavier in C major represents the classical overture style, serious and solemn, contrapuntally masterly and musically eloquently accomplished. The accompanying fugue, on the other hand, bursts with vitality and wit; an almost endless chain of sixteenth notes allows the fugue theme to dance lightly and nimbly through the voices.

Jörg Widmann's 11 humoresques are inspired by the spirit of Robert Schumann. Schumann created a monument to the musical wink in his Humoreske op. 20. According to Schumann himself, he was inspired by the humour of the writer Jean Paul. Widmann processes this Schumannian spirit according to his own taste in his Humoreske "Mit Humor und Feinsinn" (With humour and subtlety) and draws on new sources of inspiration in the sound space of contemporary music; not without losing the necessary seriousness. 

In 1841, Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy composed the Variations serieuses, the "serious, earnest" variations, entirely in the spirit of seriousness. Strictly contrapuntal, mindful of Bach, Mendelssohn virtually formulates a pattern of the four-part movement as the theme of the variations. There is a great deal of seriousness and seriousness in the variations. But they also artfully conceal humour and, at times, musical jokes. 

Frédéric Chopin created a standard work of classical literature with his Études for the Piano. All of the technical challenges for the pianist are artfully practised here, sometimes seriously and serenely, then again cheekily and wittily. The Étude op. 10 No. 5 - also called the "Black Key Étude" - is one of the most famous in the collection. 

The epitome of the highly artistic musical joke is represented by the composer Leopold Godowsky. With his 53 studies of Frédéric Chopin's études, Godowsky raised the artistry of piano playing to a new level. Thus, the étude "Badinage", which is a combination of Chopin's études op. 10 No. 5 and op. 25 No. 9, is also a musical sophistication without equal. The ludicrous technical challenges for the player in no way diminish the listener's joyful impression.

So what do the serious and the joking have in common, what unites them? An essential aspect of the (musical) joke is described by a sentence title of Jörg Widmann's 11 humoresques: Feinsinn. Musical humour and seriousness can be based on claptrap, on wit, on showmanship, on quotations or on coquetry; but it must never disregard subtlety in order to achieve perfection."


 

 

 

 

Ayaka Watanabe

Japan

Saturday, 24 September 2022

16:30 - 17:00

 

Biography

 

Ayaka Watanabe was born in Tokushima, Japan and began playing the piano at the age of three. 

Already during her studies, she played solo and chamber music in various concerts in Tokyo as well as Tokushima. 

In 2016 and 2018, she gave solo concerts at Otsuka Vega Hall in Tokushima. She also performed at solo concerts organized by Bösendolfer Tokyo, a concert at Omotesando KAWAI Concert Hall Pause and at the graduation concert of Tokyo College of Music. After graduating, she played Rhapsody in Blue with the NSO Orchestra (a brass band) and Rachmaninoff Piano Concert No.2 with the Edogawa Philharmonic Orchestra. She played solo concerto at Bechstein Centrum in Berlin. 

She won the special prize at the 16th Japan Music Competition, the audience prize at the 27th Takarazuka Vega Music Competition, 1st prize in the piano category at the 3rd Edogawa New Musicians Competition, and 3rd prize at the Artur Schnabel Competition 2020 (Germany).

She is currently continuing her studies on the piano with Professor Gottlieb Wallisch and on the fortepiano with Professor Lucas Blondeel at the Berlin University of the Arts. 

 

Concert programme

 

Beautiful modulations of Ballade

 

  • Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924): Ballade, op.19
  • Franz Liszt (1811-1886): Ballade No.2 S171 R.16

 

"In my opinion, the hardest thing in composition is to modulate naturally and beautifully. If the keys are related, it is not so difficult, but if not, it is difficult to modulate naturally. 

Both composers Faure and Listzt tried to modulate with chromatic scales and enharmonic keys to unrelated keys. We can of course find the attempt on other works by other composers, but this time I would show the beautiful harmony, with the works of Listzt and Faure, who had direct contact at that time."


 

 

 

 

Xinlai  Liu

China

Saturday, 24 September 2022

17:00 - 17:30

 

Biografie

 

Xinlai Liu was born in China in 1998 and received her first piano lessons at the age of four. Since 2017 she has been studying at the Hochschule für Musik und Tanz, Cologne. First with Prof. Ilja Scheps and from 2021 in the class of Prof. Fabio Bidini. In 2019, she received a scholarship as 1st prize winner of the Brigitte Kempen Competition of the HfMT Cologne. She is currently a scholarship holder of the Gesellschaft für Christlich-Jüdische Zusammenarbeit Aachen e.V..

 

She is active as a soloist and chamber musician and performs at music festivals such as the Euro Arte Academy, ClaviColgne MasterClass and the PianoFest in Sint-Niklaas. She received further chamber music inspiration with the Goldmund Piano Trio at the Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy University Competition 2021 and the Lyons International Chamber Music Competition. She is currently intensifying her chamber

She is currently intensifying her chamber music activities in studies with Prof. Hans-Christian Schweiker and Prof. Beldi.

 

Concert programme

 

Painting music

 

  • Claude Debussy (1862-1918): Estampes
    • Pagodes
    • La soirée dans Grenade
    • Jardins sous la pluie 
  • Maurice Ravel (1875-1937): Miroirs
    • Une barque sur l'océan
    • Alborada del gracioso
    • La vallée des cloches 

 

"How is it that music creates scenes of nature, characters or even buildings in our mind's eye, or that sounds make us think of walks in the countryside, the afterglow of the setting sun, the falling leaves or the ringing of distant bells?

And all this only in the fleeting moment in which these very sounds are heard. We cannot fix anything or take it home as a souvenir - we are, so to speak, at the mercy of the always ephemeral experience of our organ, the ear. But what potential lies dormant in it!

Instead of being bound to the concrete and unambiguous appearance of a pagoda, Debussy, in the first of his pieces "Estampes", is able to more than imitate the chimes of the pagoda through the use of pentatonics borrowed from gamelan music - he allows this chime to appear in several shades and different timbres, sometimes more urgent, sometimes more contemplative, and all the time alternating between near and far. The result is an experience that is ignited by an image but goes far beyond it.

The second piece, "La soirée dans Grenade", is based on the habanera rhythm, like an ostinato, which evokes associations with Spanish and South American dance. According to the title, the "Evening in Granada" is the scenario to be imagined. But even more than the mere association of the rhythm and the scale reminiscent of the Far East, it is also the timing of the appearance of the habanera rhythm, performed alone and in one voice, that is decisive. Thus, after great surges and sweeping broken chords, we hear again a single remaining habanera voice, which seems like a return to the evening calm and the flickering of the warm air. So here, too, the figurative association is extended by the musical category of time.

"Jardins sous la pluie" - "Gardens in the Rain" is the third and last piece of the "Estampes" and introduces us to the world of children who frolic in these very rainy gardens. The melodies of the two children's songs "Do, do, l'enfant do" and "Nous n'irons plus au bois" are used, which give the whole piece its naive and innocent basic tone. Exactly how this is done is like a stroke of genius: as if from a single mould, all the oscillations and variations of the melody of the first song seem to be one, even the contrasting and calmer second children's song only gains its meaning in the constellation in which it appears - a moment of pause in the midst of all the commotion. We find similar images and associations in the pieces "Une barque sur l'océan" ("A Barque on the Ocean"), "Alborada del gracioso" ("Morning Song of the Jester") and "La vallée des cloches" ("The Valley of the Bells") from Ravel's cycle "Miroirs". We encounter the chimes from the pagodas again in the third piece, just as we can recognize echoes of Spanish dance rhythms again in "Alborada del gracioso" or find the iridescent play of water set to music in "Une barque sur l'océan" through rapid chains of sixteenth notes - this time probably with greater gestures of undulating water than is probably the case in Debussy's "Jardins sous la pluie". But in Ravel's work, too, the concrete image encounters problems of translation into music: we hear the beginning of the "Alborado del Gracioso" and can very well imagine the song and dance of the jester, but after a caesura and the insertion of an extremely serious lament, the image is robbed of all clarity. What exactly is being lamented here?

Fortunately, here too the apparent flaw is what is exciting and cannot be conclusively fathomed - Ravel provides us with images in which we can immerse ourselves, but with which he leaves us alone again after a certain point."



FINAL ROUND

 

 

 

 

Onute Grazinyte

Lithuania

Sunday, 25 September 2022

09:00 - 10:00

 

Biography

 

Onutė Gražinytė was born to a family of musicians in 1996 in Vilnius, Lithuania. At the age of five, she started studying piano under her mother. At the age of six, she entered the National M.K. Čiurlionis School of Art.

Since 2015, O. Gražinytė has studied piano under the tutelage of Roland Krüger at the Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media, at the moment she continues her studies in Hanns Eisler Music Academy Berlin in prof. Kirill Gerstein’s class.

She took part in master classes led by Matti Raekallio, Ewa Kupiec, Andrei Gavrilov, Stephen Kovacevich, Ronald Brautigam etc.

O. Gražinytė is a laureate of 10 national and international competitions: was awarded a diploma and a special prize for the best performance of a 20th c. work at the 4th International Young Performers Competition in Głubczyce (Poland, 2007), a prize at the Leonas Povilaitis Young Performers Competition (2008), a prize at the J.S Bach National Competition in Vilnius (2009), a laureate diploma and a special prize for the best performance of B.Dvarionas’ work at the 17th Balys Dvarionas Piano and String Instrument Competition in Vilnius (2012), the first prize at the 4th Rosario Marciano International Piano Competition in Vienna (2012), the first prize and a special prize from a jury member Marian Sobula in the EMCY Peter Toperczer International Piano Competition in Slovakia, etc.

As a soloist, O. Gražinytė has appeared with the Lithuanian State Symphony Orchestra, Alicante University Philharmonic Orchestra, Salzburg Mozarteum Orchestra and National Orchestra of Lyon.

She gave recitals in Lithuania, Switzerland, Italy, Austria, Germany, Estonia, the Netherlands, Poland, France and Denmark.

In 2015, the President of the Republic of Lithuania acknowledged O. Gražinytė for her musical achievements in national and international competitions.

In 2017, O. Gražinytė has collaborated with Musik21 Niedersachsen contemporary music ensemble at the Cologne Philharmonic Hall where she performed a harpsichord part.

In 2018 the young pianist had performed in renowned concert halls, such as Warsaw Philharmonie as well as Berlin Konzerthaus.

In the same year, Onute became a winner of “Haiou Zhang Piano Award 2018”.

She is also an ardent chamber music lover, enjoys playing duos with violin or cello.

In 2020 her debut CD Lamentate (Accentus Music) comprising of the literature for piano by Arvo Pärt in collaboration with Lithuanian National Symphonic Orchestra and Lithuanian National Philharmonie.

 

Concert programme

 

"Musical Pictures"

 

  • Alexander Nikolajewitsch Skrjabin (1872-1915): Präludium Op. 17 Nr. 6
  • Olivier Messiaen (1908-1992): Präludium Nr. 1 "La colombe"
  • Mikalojus Konstantinas Čiurlionis (1875-1911): Präludium d-moll VL 239
  • Olivier Messiaen (1908-1992): Präludium Nr. 7 "Plainte calme"
  • Mikalojus Konstantinas Čiurlionis (1875-1911): Präludium Des-Dur ("Pastoral") VL187
  • Alexander Nikolajewitsch Skrjabin (1872-1915): Präludium Op. 11 Nr. 15
    • Präludium Op. 11 Nr.1
    • Präludium Op. 39 Nr. 2
  • Modest Petrowitsch Mussorgski (1839-1881): "Bilder einer Ausstellung"

 

This program begins with a cycle of preludes by three connected composers: M. K. Ciurlionis, A. Scriabin and O. Messiaen. Ciurlionis and Scriabin were contemporaries and prolific composers of piano music, who are seen by many to share similarities in compositional style. Olivier Messiaen himself commented that Ciurlionis and Scriabin were soulmates. I was very keen to explore their similarities and differences myself.
A connecting point between these three composers is the strong influence of color and art (this is why I have chosen to complete the program with “Pictures at an Exhibition” by Modest Mussorgsky.)
Ciurlionis was not only one of the greatest composers of my homeland, but also one of the great artists. In our second-largest city Kaunas, there is a museum of Ciurlionis’ paintings. Since both - music and art - were equally important to him, he searched for syntheses - often painting musical forms such as sonatas and fugues.
Scriabin and Messiaen both experienced so-called “color-hearing” (synesthesia) and saw concrete colors upon hearing certain tones and harmonies. Messiaen wrote very specific color indications for each of his early preludes: “orange, with violet veins” for the first one and “smooth gray with reflections of mauve and green” for the seventh.
I combined this self-formed cycle of preludes with “Pictures at an Exhibition”, because its main stimulus was an art exhibition by his late friend Viktor Hartmann. Although the few of those pictures and sketches one can still see today are not the most impressive pieces of art, Mussorgsky found them absolutely stunning and composed this massive cycle in only two weeks.
I felt a strong unifying connection through this program and wanted to explore the synthesis and impact of color, visual art in music, and create a synesthesia-like experience for every listener.


 

 

 

 

Maria khokhlova

Russia

Sunday, 25 September 2022

10:00 - 11:00

 

Biography

 

Maria Khokhlova was born 05.07.1991 in Ekaterinburg, Russia. She graduated with honors from the Special Music School and Ural College of Music. She studied piano with professor Alexej Boukreev.
Currently she is studying at the Hochschule für Musik Franz Liszt in Weimar with Prof. Gerlinde Otto.
 During the years of her studies, she became the winner of various national and international competitions and festivals, such as Amadeus International Piano Competition (1st prize , Czech Republic), the first Europe-Asia International Piano Competition (1st prize and special prize, Russia ) , 7 International Piano Competition Nikolai Rubinstein ( 3rd prize, France ), the International Piano Competition Seiler (4 prize and diploma , Greece), International Piano Competition Ricardo Vines (Spain) (2nd prize) and others.  In 2018 she received the speсial prize for the best performance of classical sonata at the International Franz Liszt piano competition with opportunity to play solo recital on the Liszt’s piano at 17 Bayreuther Klavierfestival in summer 2019, in 2019 she received Medaile of the Ville Epinal at the Epinal piano competition and was semifinalist of Ettore Pozzoli piano competition, in 2021 she was chosen to participate at Queen Elisabeth piano competition in Brussels.
Maria Khokhlova  participated in masterclasses with Mikhail Voskresensky, Imre Rohman, Aquilles delle Vigne, Natalia Trull, Grigory Gruzman, Eberhard Feltz and others.
Maria Khokhlova regularly gives concerts in the cities of Russia and Germany. She performed with Ural State Conservatory Orchestra, Orchestra “Liceym Camerata”.
Maria is also a chamber musician. In 2011 she founded “Klaviertrio Ekaterinburg”, and performs with Marina Zakharova (violin) and Anastasia Chernukhina (cello). Klaviertrio Ekaterinburg is participant of the international music festivals in Yekaterinburg, St. Petersburg, Moscow, Kazan, and the cities of Germany. 2014-2016 they were studying at the Hochschule für Musik Hanns Eisler in Berlin in the class of prof. Eberhard Feltz. They are diplomants of the First All-Russian Music Competition in Moscow (2011), and the first prize winners of the International Maria Yudina Competition, Saint-Petersbourg, Russia (2013). Their repertoire includes works  by Beethoven, Mozart, Haydn, Hummel, Brahms, Mendelssohn, Smetana, Rakhmaninov, Shausson, Dmitriy Shostakovich, Georgy Sviridov, Boris Tchaikovsky, Franck Martin, Mauricio Kagel, and others.

 

Concert programme

 

"Ut Musica Poesis - Sounding Poetry"

 

  • Franz Liszt (1811-1886): Frühlingsglaube aus 12 Lieder von Franz Schubert
  • Robert Schumann (1810-1856): Fantasie op. 17
    • 1. Durchaus phantastisch und liedenschaftlich vorzutragen
  • Johannes Brahms (1833-1897): Aus Drei Intermezzi op.117
    • 1. Es-Dur. Andante Moderato
  • Franz Liszt (1811-1886): Erlkönig aus 12 Lieder von Franz Schubert
  • Franz Liszt (1811-1886): Après une lecture du Dante: Fantasia quasi Sonata

 

The composers of the Romantic period tried to romanticize everything around them, all the phenomena of life. The soul and individuality of the individual and his feelings were important to them. The special feature of this epoch is that the Romantics did not strive for a clear division of art into types and genres. They were impressed by the idea of the Gesamtkunstwerk and implemented it successfully.
In addition to two arrangements of Schubert songs by Franz Liszt, the "Frühlingsglaube" after Uhland's poem and Goethe's ballad "Der Erlkönig", the programme also includes works inspired in one way or another by poetry.

Schumann, who was well versed in literature, set a stanza by Friedrich Schlegel as the motto for his composition:

Resounding through all the notes
In the earth's colourful dream
There sounds a faint long-drawn note
For the one who listens in secret.

In 1830, Hector Berlioz's Symphonie fantastique had been premiered, a programme-musical work that Schumann later reviewed in detail. Following contemporary developments, he sought to bring literature and music together in an individual way, which is reflected above all in his piano music.
The Adagio-Coda begins with a secret love message to his beloved Clara: a phrase quoted from the last song in Beethoven's song cycle "An die ferne Geliebte": "Accept, then, these songs. I sang for you, beloved."

"Lullaby of an unhappy mother" is the name of the Scottish ballad translated by Herder, whose lines Brahms added to his Intermezzo op. 117 1st Andante moderato as a motto: "Sleep softly, my child, sleep softly and sweetly, it troubles me to see you cry." What lies behind this is the tragic story of Anne Bothwell, the daughter of the Bishop of Orkney, who fell in love with her own cousin and now sings of men's infidelity alongside her child - in Brahms's case, a lullaby of wistful parting pain.

F. Liszt Après une lecture du Dante: Fantasia quasi Sonata

(After a reading of Dante: Fantasia quasi Sonata.)
It was first published in 1856 as part of the second volume Années de pèlerinage (Years of Pilgrimage). This work of programme music was inspired by the reading of Dante Alighieri's most famous Divine Comedy. Fantasia consists of nine different motifs representing the nine different levels of hell. In addition, Liszt created two main themes or ideas within the nine motives, one in major and one in minor. The minor theme is meant to represent the dark nature of hell, while the major theme is meant to represent Beatrice and heaven.


 

 

 

 

Tsuzumi Namikawa

Japan

Sunday, 25 September 2022

11:00 - 12:00

 

Biography

 

Tsuzumi Namikawa, born in 1997 in Asahikawa, Japan, received her first piano lessons at the age of five. In 2012, she moved to Braunschweig with her family and took piano lessons with Prof. Wolfgang Zill. She is currently studying at the Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media in the piano class of Prof. Ewa Kupiec and has won several prizes at national and international competitions. Her latest successes include 1st prize at the International Piano Prize "Napolinova", Naples in May 2022. At the international competition "Münchner Klavierpodium der Jugend" she was awarded ten prizes in total. In 2014, she won 1st prize at the Carl Bechstein Competition in Berlin together with her piano duo partner Nina Ding. In 2019, she won 2nd prize at the "International Competition PianoTalents" in Milan. Tsuzumi Namikawa was twice awarded the Louis-Spohr-Jugend- Musikförderpreis of the city of Braunschweig and enriched the cultural life of the region in several concerts. Concerts have taken her beyond the borders of Germany to Switzerland, Austria, Finland and Japan. She received further artistic impulses from Akiko Ebi, Alexei Lubimov and Konstanze Eickhorst, among others.

 

Concert programme

 

"Landscapes and human life - the world as a universal entity"

 

  • Robert Schumann (1810-1856): Aus Kinderszenen, op. 15:
    • Nr. 1 Von fremden Ländern und Menschen

 

  • Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849): Mazurken op. 56
    • Nr. 1 H-Dur
    • Nr. 2 C-Dur
    • Nr. 3 c-moll
  • Robert Schumann (1810-1856): Freundliche Landschaft aus Waldszenen, op. 82
  • Jean Sibelius (1865-1957): Der Hirt, op. 58, Nr. 4
  • Robert Schumann (1810-1856): Vogel als Prophet aus Waldszenen, op. 82
  • Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849): Tarantella
  • Claude Debussy (1862-1918): Reflets dans l’eau
  • Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849): Barcarolle
  • Jean Sibelius (1865-1957): Des Abends, op. 58, Nr. 5

 

"A golden age in which there was no separation, no boundaries, neither between humans, nor between humans and nature, nor between the arts." (Peter Rummenhöller)
Especially in the Romantic era, the beauty of nature was expressed in art. Endless fields, chirping birds, dancing people - In this programme we take a look at an idyllic life in the countryside.


 

 

 

 

Georg kjurdian

Litvia

Sunday, 25 September 2022

13:00 - 14:00

 

Biography

 

Georg Kjurdian was born in Riga in 1994. He received piano and composition lessons (from Pēteris Vasks) at the Emīls-Dārziņš Music High School there. He then came to Germany to begin his piano studies at the Robert Schumann Hochschule in Düsseldorf with Barbara Szczepanska. He completed his Master's degree in Professional Performance at the Folkwang University of the Arts in Essen with Hisako Kawamura. This was followed by studies with Arnulf von Arnim at the Musikhochschule Münster. Since 2021, Georg Kjurdian has been studying in the "Instrumental Duo with Pianist" programme at the Folkwang University of the Arts with Evgeni Sinaiski.
He received further important impulses from master classes by Jacques Rouvier, Dmitri Baschkirow, Jan Wijn, Pavel Gililov, Imogen Cooper and Stephen Kovacevich, among others. His concert activities have taken him to concert halls such as the Jahrhunderthalle (Bochum), the Robert-Schumann-Saal (Düsseldorf), the Rhein-Mosel-Halle (Koblenz), the Gewandhaus zu Leipzig, Die Glocke (Bremen) and the Mercatorhalle (Duisburg). He has recorded for Latvian Radio (2009, 2015), WDR3 (2012, 2013) and MDR Figaro (2014).
Georg Kjurdian is a prizewinner/scholarship recipient of both national and international competitions and sponsors; these include: International Rachmaninov Piano Competition for Young Pianists (Frankfurt/Main, 2013, 3rd prize), Werner Richard - Dr. Carl Dörken Foundation (2013), Gen Re Promotion Scholarship 2014 for Young Soloists, Scholarship of the Cultural Foundation "Wasserburg zum Haus" (Ratingen, 2014/15), International Johann Sebastian Bach Competition (Leipzig, 2014, 3rd prize, Audience Prize), Carl-Heinz Foundation (2014/15). Prize, Audience Award), Carl-Heinz Illies-Förderstipendium der Deutschen Stiftung Musikleben (2015), International Bachelor Piano Award (2016, 1st prize), Köhler-Osbahr Competition (2017, 1st prize). In 2021, he was nominated for "The Great Music Award Latvia" together with violinist Magdalena Geka.
Georg Kjurdian also regularly plays newer and newest music, for example the world premiere of a work by the young Latvian composer Linda Leimane.

 

Concert programme

 

"Foreshadowing of the end"

 

  • Johannes Brahms (1833-1897): 3 Intermezzi op. 117
  • Anton Webern (1883-1945): Variationen op. 27
  • Dmitri Schostakowitsch (1906-1975): Klaviersonate No. 2 Op. 61

 

It is always very interesting to observe how historical events have influenced art, what means of expression one has sought in order to be able to express one's own ideas more clearly. The turn of the century to the 20th century was a special time in which very many different directions emerged after Romanticism, not least because it was no longer so stable socially. All turning points are felt very intensely by artists - one tries to find a balance in one's own work and often, involuntarily, one anticipates events that will happen in the near future.
1892. In the summer of that year, Johannes Brahms begins the series of his piano miniatures that we know today with opus numbers from 116 to 119. "Lullabies of my suffering" - that's what he called his little pieces in a letter to his publisher. Less dramatic pathos, but therefore more melancholy and quiet sadness can be heard in these works. Is this a mourning for his own past life? Or an unconscious feeling that the old world in which he grew up and matured will soon come to an end and something new, strange and terrible will come? The op. 117 is musically the least radical when compared to the other Brahmsian late cycles. But even here there are moments, albeit brief, when one can feel not sadness or melancholy, but a genuine terror and hopelessness.
1936. A dark time comes for Anton Webern - ideologically, he does not fit at all into the framework of the new regime. He is not allowed to pursue his artistic activities publicly, what remains for him is to teach composition privately and to write music without hoping that it will be performed at some point. His musical language is already formed at this point - and there is no place for the key. Classical harmony, on which all European music was based, no longer exists - instead, the twelve-tone technique, which is not easy for the human ear to perceive, comes in, especially at that time. Rhythm remains the only means of musical expression that listeners can still follow - melody and harmony already exist in another dimension. The twelve-tone technique gives the music a feeling of instability and reflects very accurately the time in which the composer lived, in which fear and insecurity reigned everywhere and one could hardly look optimistically into the future.
In 1943, the Second World War had already been going on for four years and the fate of all mankind was uncertain. Dmitri Shostakovich, compared to Anton Webern, remains faithful to classical harmony. His 2nd Piano Sonata is in B minor, the key associated with death in the Baroque era. The sonata is full of symbols that suggest it is about this theme - one of these symbols is the last movement, which is in the form of a passacaglia (originally a sad slow Baroque movement). Death was always the most important theme for Shostakovich. At the end of his life, he wrote the following movement: "In the end, death is simple. If you understand that, then many things look much simpler, and you get simpler answers to many questions". At the end of this sonata, the music becomes more and more emotionally distant, because in the end this is just the tragedy of a human being when he dies. The world existed before he was born and will pass it on.


 

 

 

 

Johannes Obermeier

Germany

Sunday, 25 September 2022

14:00 - 15:00

 

Biography

 

Johannes Obermeier, born in Munich in 1998, received piano lessons from the age of five. He began learning the saxophone at the age of eight, and the trumpet three years later.
In 2012, Johannes Obermeier was accepted as a junior student in the piano class of Prof. Olaf Dreßler and the saxophone class of Prof. Koryun Asatryan at the University of Music and Performing Arts in Munich. In addition to music, he began fulltime studies in business administration at LMU Munich in 2016, graduating with a Master's degree in March 2022. Since autumn 2019, Johannes Obermeier has also been studying composition as a major subject with Prof. Jan Müller-Wieland and piano as an artistic major subject with Prof. Adrian Oetiker at the Musikhochschule München.
Johannes Obermeier has been leading a number of ensembles for several years, supports the work with young musicians on a voluntary basis and can be heard time and again in concerts in and around Munich. He is also active as a conductor.
At the age of 7 he won a first prize at the Karl Lang Competition. At "Jugend musiziert", "Jugend komponiert" and many other competitions he won many highest prizes in the subjects saxophone, piano and composition as well as several awards and special prizes for outstanding performances. He is the winner of the Pegalogos Prize 2016, the Günter-Bialas-Förderpreis 2022 of the Bavarian Academy of Fine Arts, 2nd prize winner of the Steinway-Förderpreis 2022 as well as a scholarship holder of the Deutschlandstipendium.
Johannes Obermeier also has a special interest in chamber music. In recent years, he has been invited several times to festivals throughout Germany and has played with members of various German orchestras. His work brings him together with musicians such as Volker Banfield, Ian Bostridge, Gerold Huber, Peter Michael Hamel, Donald Sulzen, Yaron Rosenthal, Christian Lauba, Mark Andre and Minas Borboudakis.
Since winter semester 2021/22, Johannes Obermeier holds a student teaching position in accompaniment for instrumental classes as well as opera and oratorio at the Hochschule für Musik und Theater München.

 

Concert programme

 

"Sonata form in the course of time"

 

  • Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757): Sonate K 132 C-Dur
  • Joseph Haydn (1732-1809): Sonate As-Dur, Hob. XVI, 46,
    • 1. Satz: Allegro moderato
  • Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827): Sonate op. 10 Nr. 3, D-Dur
  • Claude Debussy (1862-1918): Estampes

 

For many, the sonata is the epitome of classical music. Virtually every composer who has made a name for himself has written sonatas. The actual origin of the word sonata is nothing other than a piece of sound (from the Latin "sonare"). Only the course of time determined that this piece of sound should be given a form. Domenico Scarlatti wrote an impressive collection of 555 sonatas for the harpsichord. Scarlatti, who was himself a highly virtuoso harpsichordist, wrote his sonatas in many different ways. His collection contains the eccentric, the lyrical, the virtuosic and the tender. Scarlatti's originality is particularly impressive - even for his contemporaries. His compositions are often full of surprises and bold harmonic turns, as in the Sonata K 132 in C major. But Scarlatti was one of the first to cast the sonata (especially for the harpsichord) in a form that served as an important model for the sonata of Viennese Classicism.
Joseph Haydn is considered one of the founders of the classical sonata form. The sonata of Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert and later Liszt would be unthinkable without Haydn. He crystallized the form of the exposition and the recapitulation and developed the development, the core of the sonata form. Musical refinement is united here with harmonic boldness and skilful treatment of themes. The opening movement of the Sonata in A-flat major, Hob. XVI, 46 is a prime example of this.  
One of the greatest composers of all time is also closely associated with Viennese Classicism: Ludwig van Beethoven. His 32 piano sonatas belong to the standard repertoire of every pianist. After Haydn and Mozart, Beethoven raised the sonata to a new level. His conception is no longer purely formal and structural, but develops programmatically and dramatically. This is already evident in his earlier sonatas, including the Sonata op. 10 No. 3 in D major. In the deeply sad 2nd movement, Beethoven evokes the lover of Goethe's Egmont and paints a sombre picture of her tragic death.
Throughout his life, Claude Debussy was constantly striving to reform classical formal structures. Nevertheless, he could not avoid continuing to use the tried and tested means, as many composers before him had done. In his "Estampes", Debussy paints colourful pictures in the imaginary postcard memory of the listener with a large brush. In the "Pagodes", Chinese temples rise in green-covered gardens, the Habanera dreams of the shimmering heat of light-footed Spanish dancers and in the French gardens, the "Jardins sous la pluie", the rain drips fine dots on the glass window. Despite this pictorial violence, Debussy remains faithful to the old forms, albeit far more liberally than Beethoven. The basic structures, however, remain intact, especially the principle of recapitulation, which has striven for its place in music history as both a recognition value and a simultaneous alienation.
Thus, the sonata has retained its form up to the present day. Despite its freedom, its rigour gives the listener a sense of security. Even though the shadows of the past loom large over the present, the sonata form is not yet finished and should be populated with further masterpieces on its way to completion.


 

 

 

 

Lorenzo mazzola

Italy

Sunday, 25 September 2022

15:00 - 16:00

 

Biography

 

Lorenzo Mazzola, born on 28 September 1995 in Bergamo, began piano lessons at the age of five. After the classical baccalaureate, he graduated from the Conservatorio Gaetano Donizetti in Bergamo in 2020 with top marks under the direction of M. Giovanetti and M. Motterle. Despite a $45,000 scholarship from the Mannes College of Music in New York, he preferred to stay in Europe and moved to Germany the following year to complete his studies.
He is currently attending the concert exam course at the HfMDK in Frankfurt am Main with Maestro O. Kern.
He has been a finalist or prize-winner in numerous scholarships and international piano competitions, including the Barbisotti Scholarship - UBIBanca in Bergamo, the Baldi Competition in Bologna and the Liszt Competition in Parma, where he also won several special prizes, including one for the best performance of the compulsory piece: Liszt's Sonata in B minor.
He has performed in major halls - Teatro Donizetti and Creberg in Bergamo, Gaber Auditorium in Milan, Teatro Regio in Parma, Pilgrimage Church in Mariazell (Austria), HfMDK Concert Hall in Frankfurt (Germany), Lithuanian National Philharmonic in Vilnius (Lithuania).
He has performed at the Brescia and Bergamo Piano Festivals, the Verdi Festival of Parma, the Società dei Concerti of Milan, the Festival dell'Emilia Romagna and the Vilnius Piano Festival. As a soloist he has collaborated with important soloists and orchestras - the Orchestra Arturo Toscanini dell'Emilia Romagna and the Orchestra sinfonica di Chioggia, under the conductors M° S. Percacciolo and M° C. Perini. Some of his concerts have been recorded by national and local radio stations, and many of them have received rave reviews in the press.
He has attended master classes with eminent pianists including M° Dmitri Alexeev, Jerome Rose, Pavel Gililov and Konstantin Bogino. He has collaborated, including in concerts, with eminent musicians such as Antonio Ballista.
In 2013, at the age of seventeen, he was selected by the Conservatorio Donizetti in Bergamo to record a Liszt study for Sony Classical Talent Scout.
In addition to his intense concert activity, he taught piano at the Accademia Santa Cecilia in Bergamo for several years.

 

Concert programme

 

"Schubert, Liszt, Goethe and the Wanderer"

 

  • Franz Liszt (1811-1886): Soirée de Vienne no. 6 aus Franz Schuberts Valse caprice
  • Franz Liszt (1811-1886): Der Müller und der Bach aus Franz Schuberts "Die schöne Müllerin"
  • Franz Liszt (1811-1886): Gretchen am Spinnrade - Lied von Franz Schubert
  • Franz Liszt (1811-1886): Impromptu in G-dur op. 90 no. 3
  • Franz Liszt (1811-1886): Sonata in H-moll

 

In the Romantic Age, literary suggestions increasingly formed the basis of musical creation. With this programme, I would like to explore a particular strand of this symbiosis. It is the theme of the Wanderer, in love and without hope, which spread throughout Europe starting with Goethe's Werther, and which finds a perfect correspondence in the character of Schubert's music.
After Schubert's elegant Soirées de Vienne no. 6, beautifully transcribed for solo piano by F. Liszt, which elegantly introduces the theme, we move on to two lieder, also by Schubert-Liszt, that explore the theme of lovesickness from both male and female points of view: Der Muller und der Bach, from Wilhelm Muller's cycle of poems, and Gretchen am Spinnrade, from Goethe's Faust, a capital work that we will also deal with in the second part of the programme, immediately after a short improvisation, also by Schubert, op. 90 no. 3 in G flat, which is in a way the manifesto of the Wanderer.
Liszt's Sonata in B minor, a fundamental work of the Romantic era and at the same time a cyclic sonata, symphonic poem (but without text) and pure music, is truly difficult to classify. The most quoted theory still holds that it is a free transposition into music of Goethe's Faust, from which numerous elements may be recognisable: the demonic theme, the properly diabolic theme, the angelic theme, which overlaps with that of Marguerite. But the surprising thing is that, net of the reworkings, it turns out that all these themes consist of a single theme! Therein lies the profound mystery of this great and inexhaustible composition.



AWARD WINNERS' CONCERT

 

 

 

 

LORENZO MAZZOLA

Italy

Sunday, 25 September 2022

19:00 - 19:45

 

Biography

 

Lorenzo Mazzola, born on 28 September 1995 in Bergamo, began piano lessons at the age of five. After the classical baccalaureate, he graduated from the Conservatorio Gaetano Donizetti in Bergamo in 2020 with top marks under the direction of M. Giovanetti and M. Motterle. Despite a $45,000 scholarship from the Mannes College of Music in New York, he preferred to stay in Europe and moved to Germany the following year to complete his studies.
He is currently attending the concert exam course at the HfMDK in Frankfurt am Main with Maestro O. Kern.
He has been a finalist or prize-winner in numerous scholarships and international piano competitions, including the Barbisotti Scholarship - UBIBanca in Bergamo, the Baldi Competition in Bologna and the Liszt Competition in Parma, where he also won several special prizes, including one for the best performance of the compulsory piece: Liszt's Sonata in B minor.
He has performed in major halls - Teatro Donizetti and Creberg in Bergamo, Gaber Auditorium in Milan, Teatro Regio in Parma, Pilgrimage Church in Mariazell (Austria), HfMDK Concert Hall in Frankfurt (Germany), Lithuanian National Philharmonic in Vilnius (Lithuania).
He has performed at the Brescia and Bergamo Piano Festivals, the Verdi Festival of Parma, the Società dei Concerti of Milan, the Festival dell'Emilia Romagna and the Vilnius Piano Festival. As a soloist he has collaborated with important soloists and orchestras - the Orchestra Arturo Toscanini dell'Emilia Romagna and the Orchestra sinfonica di Chioggia, under the conductors M° S. Percacciolo and M° C. Perini. Some of his concerts have been recorded by national and local radio stations, and many of them have received rave reviews in the press.
He has attended master classes with eminent pianists including M° Dmitri Alexeev, Jerome Rose, Pavel Gililov and Konstantin Bogino. He has collaborated, including in concerts, with eminent musicians such as Antonio Ballista.
In 2013, at the age of seventeen, he was selected by the Conservatorio Donizetti in Bergamo to record a Liszt study for Sony Classical Talent Scout.
In addition to his intense concert activity, he taught piano at the Accademia Santa Cecilia in Bergamo for several years.

 

Concert programme
  •  Franz Liszt (1811-1886): Soirée de Vienne no. 6 aus Franz Schuberts Valse caprice
  • Dmitri Dmitrijewitsch Schostakowitsch (1906-1975):
    Prelude and fugue in D minor, Op. 87 No. 24

TSUZUMI NAMIKAWA

Japan

Sunday, 25 September 2022

19:45 - 20:15

 

Biography

 

Tsuzumi Namikawa, born in 1997 in Asahikawa, Japan, received her first piano lessons at the age of five. In 2012, she moved to Braunschweig with her family and took piano lessons with Prof. Wolfgang Zill. She is currently studying at the Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media in the piano class of Prof. Ewa Kupiec and has won several prizes at national and international competitions. Her latest successes include 1st prize at the International Piano Prize "Napolinova", Naples in May 2022. At the international competition "Münchner Klavierpodium der Jugend" she was awarded ten prizes in total. In 2014, she won 1st prize at the Carl Bechstein Competition in Berlin together with her piano duo partner Nina Ding. In 2019, she won 2nd prize at the "International Competition PianoTalents" in Milan. Tsuzumi Namikawa was twice awarded the Louis-Spohr-Jugend- Musikförderpreis of the city of Braunschweig and enriched the cultural life of the region in several concerts. Concerts have taken her beyond the borders of Germany to Switzerland, Austria, Finland and Japan. She received further artistic impulses from Akiko Ebi, Alexei Lubimov and Konstanze Eickhorst, among others.

 

 

Concert programme

 

"The night side of the soul"

  • Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849): Nocturne B Major, Op. 62 No. 1
  • Jörg Widmann (*1973): Aus Elf Humoresken
    • Lied im Traume
    • Mit Humor und Feinsinn
  • Jean Sibelius (1865-1957): Reverie, Op. 58 No. 1
  • Sergei Sergejewitsch Prokofjew (1891-1953)
    • Reminiscence, Op. 4 No. 1
    • Suggestion diabolique, Op. 4 No. 4
  • Paul Hindemith (1895-1963): Nachtstück aus "Suite 1922"

"Silence reigns, stars and moon twinkle in the dark sky, it is time to relax - But at the same time, these night hours allow us to sink deeper into our thoughts. 

This ambivalence can be felt in F. Chopin's Nocturne. It not only creates a calm, discreet atmosphere of the night, but is also associated with emotionally deep sensations and inner shocks. 

When one closes one's eyes afterwards, one is caught up in a wide variety of dreams, ranging from sweet reminiscences to hellish nightmares. As a mirror of the soul, one unconsciously dreams of the past. In J. Widmann's humoresques, gentle memories of R. Schumann's phrases collide with distorted outbursts. 

Dreams are often said to have the character of divination or oracles. For a long time, the belief prevailed that dreams were indirect or coded messages from gods and demons, as the devil whispers to one in Prokofiev's Suggestion diabolique.

In Hindemith's "Nachtstück", the uncanny is set to music in the darkness until a trace of dawn can be heard in the last bars."


 

 

 

 

JOHANNES OBERMEIER

Germany

Sunday, 25 September 2022

20:35 - 21:30

 

Biography

 

Johannes Obermeier, born in Munich in 1998, received piano lessons from the age of five. He began learning the saxophone at the age of eight, and the trumpet three years later.
In 2012, Johannes Obermeier was accepted as a junior student in the piano class of Prof. Olaf Dreßler and the saxophone class of Prof. Koryun Asatryan at the University of Music and Performing Arts in Munich. In addition to music, he began fulltime studies in business administration at LMU Munich in 2016, graduating with a Master's degree in March 2022. Since autumn 2019, Johannes Obermeier has also been studying composition as a major subject with Prof. Jan Müller-Wieland and piano as an artistic major subject with Prof. Adrian Oetiker at the Musikhochschule München.
Johannes Obermeier has been leading a number of ensembles for several years, supports the work with young musicians on a voluntary basis and can be heard time and again in concerts in and around Munich. He is also active as a conductor.
At the age of 7 he won a first prize at the Karl Lang Competition. At "Jugend musiziert", "Jugend komponiert" and many other competitions he won many highest prizes in the subjects saxophone, piano and composition as well as several awards and special prizes for outstanding performances. He is the winner of the Pegalogos Prize 2016, the Günter-Bialas-Förderpreis 2022 of the Bavarian Academy of Fine Arts, 2nd prize winner of the Steinway-Förderpreis 2022 as well as a scholarship holder of the Deutschlandstipendium.
Johannes Obermeier also has a special interest in chamber music. In recent years, he has been invited several times to festivals throughout Germany and has played with members of various German orchestras. His work brings him together with musicians such as Volker Banfield, Ian Bostridge, Gerold Huber, Peter Michael Hamel, Donald Sulzen, Yaron Rosenthal, Christian Lauba, Mark Andre and Minas Borboudakis.
Since winter semester 2021/22, Johannes Obermeier holds a student teaching position in accompaniment for instrumental classes as well as opera and oratorio at the Hochschule für Musik und Theater München.

 

Concert programme

 

"Musical Seriousness and Jest"

  • Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750): BWV 870, Wohltemperiertes Klavier, 2. Band, Prelude and Fugue in C major
  • Jörg Widmann (*1973): aus: 11 Humoresken: XI "Mit Humor und Feinsinn"
  • Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809-1847): Variations sérieuses op. 54
  • Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849): Étude op. 10 Nr. 5 in G-flat Major
  • Leopold Godowsky (1870-1938): Étude "Badinage"

"A central point of origin of music has always been that of entertainment. Although nowadays there is a strict separation between serious music and light music, this was by no means always the case. As early as the 16th century, we find musical jokes in Orlando di Lasso's Echo Chorus, for example. But there is always a spark of seriousness in joking. After all, a joke in the true sense of the word is not just a joke, but in its Latin origins an artistic playfulness. The grand master of the Baroque, Johann Sebastian Bach, was not only a master of counterpoint, but also a reconciler of serious jest and joking seriousness. The Prelude of the Second Volume of the Well-Tempered Clavier in C major represents the classical overture style, serious and solemn, contrapuntally masterly and musically eloquently accomplished. The accompanying fugue, on the other hand, bursts with vitality and wit; an almost endless chain of sixteenth notes allows the fugue theme to dance lightly and nimbly through the voices.

Jörg Widmann's 11 humoresques are inspired by the spirit of Robert Schumann. Schumann created a monument to the musical wink in his Humoreske op. 20. According to Schumann himself, he was inspired by the humour of the writer Jean Paul. Widmann processes this Schumannian spirit according to his own taste in his Humoreske "Mit Humor und Feinsinn" (With humour and subtlety) and draws on new sources of inspiration in the sound space of contemporary music; not without losing the necessary seriousness. 

In 1841, Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy composed the Variations serieuses, the "serious, earnest" variations, entirely in the spirit of seriousness. Strictly contrapuntal, mindful of Bach, Mendelssohn virtually formulates a pattern of the four-part movement as the theme of the variations. There is a great deal of seriousness and seriousness in the variations. But they also artfully conceal humour and, at times, musical jokes. 

Frédéric Chopin created a standard work of classical literature with his Études for the Piano. All of the technical challenges for the pianist are artfully practised here, sometimes seriously and serenely, then again cheekily and wittily. The Étude op. 10 No. 5 - also called the "Black Key Étude" - is one of the most famous in the collection. 

The epitome of the highly artistic musical joke is represented by the composer Leopold Godowsky. With his 53 studies of Frédéric Chopin's études, Godowsky raised the artistry of piano playing to a new level. Thus, the étude "Badinage", which is a combination of Chopin's études op. 10 No. 5 and op. 25 No. 9, is also a musical sophistication without equal. The ludicrous technical challenges for the player in no way diminish the listener's joyful impression.

So what do the serious and the joking have in common, what unites them? An essential aspect of the (musical) joke is described by a sentence title of Jörg Widmann's 11 humoresques: Feinsinn. Musical humour and seriousness can be based on claptrap, on wit, on showmanship, on quotations or on coquetry; but it must never disregard subtlety in order to achieve perfection."


Musikalische Symbole